1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 7

bet7/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
said, the study of the locally homogeneous theory in 4-dimensions is still an inter-
esting topic [45].) Of course this may not turn out to be a fruitful direction at
all, but in any case there is a wide variety of geometric structures which have been
studied in four dimensions and which are interesting in their own right, regardless
of any possible application to topology. In this section we will give a very brief
sketch of the some of these ideas.
One organising principle is the trinity of structures
g, ω, J
in multilinear algebra. Here we have in mind a real vector space V of dimension
4 on which we can consider a Euclidean structure g
∈ s
2
V

, a symplectic form
ω
∈ Λ
2
V

or a complex structure I : V
→ V, I
2
=
−1. Given any two of these we
can write down a hermitian structure, whereby V becomes a complex vector space
with a hermitian inner product. We may also consider a quaternionic structure, in
which we have I, J, K : V
→ V satisfying the quaternion relations I
2
= J
2
= K
2
=
−1, IJ = K. Of course in our situation these algebraic structures will be considered
on the tangent spaces V = T M
p
of a 4-dimensional manifold M . Now we have,
at least, the following differential-geometric structures which can be considered on
four-dimensional manifolds.
• Einstein, Ricci-soliton
• Anti-self dual.
• symplectic, almost-complex
• K¨ahler, complex algebraic
• complex
• hypercomplex
• hyperk¨ahler
• complex symplectic
(This is presented as a list but it would really be better to think of some kind
of graph, indicating the diverse connections between the concepts.) First we have
the Riemannian theories. Alongside Einstein metrics one considers Ricci solitons,
which are fixed points of the Ricci flow up to diffeomorphism. There is another class
one can consider within Riemannian geometry which is special to the 4-dimensional
situation. On an oriented Riemannian 4-manifold the Weyl tensor decomposes into
two pieces W
+
, W

(self-dual and anti-self dual), and the metric is called anti-self-
dual if W
+
= 0. This equation is conformally invariant and is an elliptic equation

INVARIANTS OF MANIFOLDS AND THE CLASSIFICATION PROBLEM
51
for the conformal structure, modulo diffeomorphism. It is related to complex geom-
etry via the “twistor construction” [4]. Next we have the symplectic and complex
theories and K¨
ahler structures which are a natural intersection of Riemannian,
symplectic and complex geometry and which, on compact manifolds of complex
dimension two, can always be deformed to complex projective surfaces. A different
kind of mix of complex and symplectic geometry is furnished by complex-symplectic
structures, where one has a non-degenerate holomorphic 2-form. It is equivalent to
say that one has a pair ω
1
, ω
2
of closed real 2-forms satisfying the conditions
ω
2
1
= ω
2
2
> 0 ω
1
∧ ω
2
= 0.
The hyperk¨
ahler case is in a sense the intersection of all these theories. A
hyperk¨
ahler manifold is a manifold with a Riemannian metric and three complex
structures, obeying the quaternion relations and such that the metric is K¨
ahler
with respect to each structure. (Hypercomplex structures are similar, but without
the requirement of a metric). In four dimensions this is the same at least up to a
covering, as saying that both the Ricci tensor and the self-dual Weyl tensor vanish.
They are also complex symplectic manifolds: in fact a hyperk¨
ahler structure is
equivalent to a triple of closed forms ω
1
, ω
2
, ω
3
satisfying the relations
ω
2
1
= ω
2
2
= ω
2
3
> 0 ω
i
∧ ω
j
= 0 i = j.
There is a complete classification of compact hyperk¨
ahler 4-manifolds: the only
non-flat examples are “K3 surfaces”. These are all diffeomorphic, one model is given
by a smooth surface of degree 4 in CP
3
. From some points of view one finds that
K3 surfaces are the “simplest” compact 4-manifolds— they have the metrics whose
curvature tensor is just the small piece W

and they have the simplest possible non-
trivial Seiberg–Witten invariants. (Of course they are also the prototypes of Calabi-
Yau manifolds in general complex geometry). They furnish a special case example
where we do have some hold on the Einstein condition. A compact oriented 4-
manifold M has two characteristic numbers, the Euler characteristic χ(M ) and the
signature σ(M ) (the latter is the signature of the intersection form on H
2
(M, R)).
The Hitchin–Thorpe inequality states that if M has an Einstein metric g then
|σ(M)| ≤
2
3
χ(M ).
If equality holds (in the simply-conected case, say) then M is a K3 surface and
the metric g is a hyperk¨
ahler. The proof goes by Chern-Weil theory which gives an
identity, for an Einstein metric,

2
(
2
3
χ(M )
± σ(M)) =
M
S
2
+
|W
±
|
2
,
where S is the scalar curvature and W
+
, W

are the components of the Weyl
tensor, as above. So if σ(M ) +
2
3
χ(M ) = 0 we deduce that the scalar curvature
and W
+
both vanish which implies that the metric is hyperk¨
ahler (and the case
σ(M )

2
3
χ(M ) = 0 follows by switching orientation). Thus if we consider a smooth
compact simply-connected, oriented 4-manifold M with σ(M ) +
2
3
χ(M ) = 0 and
if we have some way (for example by Ricci flow) of proving the existence of an
Einstein metric on M , then we could make the topological deduction that M is
diffeomorphic to a K3 surface. Conversely, as we will discuss further in Section 5
below, there are examples of manifolds M which are homotopy equivalent, but not
diffeomorphic, to K3 surfaces. We see then that these manifolds cannot support

52
S. K. DONALDSON
Einstein metrics and the differences in the smooth structures must be reflected in
some way in the behaviour of the Ricci flow. Related matters are discussed in detail
in Tian’s talk in this meeting. Let us just mention here that there are intriguing
questions about the Ricci flow in 4-dimensions even in simple model problems.
One recent example is provided by the work of Chen, LeBrun and Weber [9] who
prove the existence of an Einstein metric on the connected sum CP
2
CP
2
CP
2
.
Although the metric is not K¨
ahler it is conformal to a K¨
ahler metric and in fact
to an “extremal metric”. The striking thing here is that there is also a (K¨
ahler)
Ricci soliton metric on this same manifold, so we have a case where there are two
distinct fixed points of the Ricci flow, modulo diffeomorphism. In fact the same is
true, by older work of Calabi and Page, in the even simpler case of CP
2
CP
2
and
the metrics here both have U (2) symmetry.
Of course as we have said before, there is no certainty that any of these struc-
tures will lead to great insights into the topological classification problem. Equally
one can consider still further permutations of these ideas. For example one can
relax the hyperk¨
ahler condition to consider a triple of symplectic forms ω
1
, ω
2
, ω
3
such that the matrix ω
i
∧ ω
j
is positive definite at each point [11].
4. Invariants in low-dimensional topology
Since the early 1980’s many “new” invariants of three and four dimensional
manifolds have been discovered. What we mean by “new” here is that they go
beyond, and have a different character to, those arising from classical algebraic
topology. These developments intertwine a variety of different fields
• 3 and 4 dimensional topology, knot theory
• Symplectic and contact topolology, foliations of 3-manifolds.
Further, they are intimately connected with developments in Theoretical Physics.
There is now a constellation of differ ent but related theories, to the extent that
there are probably few people, and certainly not this author, who are familiar with
all the latest developments. As some headings we can mention
• Casson invariants
• Yang–Mills instanton invariants
• Seiberg–Witten invariants
• Floer homology
• Gromov–Witten invariants
• Contact homology
• Symplectic Field Theory
• Heegard Floer Theory
• Fukaya categories
• Jones–Witten invariants of knots and 3-manifolds
• Khovanov homology
We will not try to say anything systematic about all these developments but
just note some fundamental ideas which appear in many of them, under three
slogans.
• Integration. By which we mean functional integrals of the kind developed
in Quantum Field theory which are, generally speaking, not mathemat-
ically rigorous. These are the basis of Witten’s approach to the Jones
invariants (and, more recently, to Khovanov homology [48]). They are

INVARIANTS OF MANIFOLDS AND THE CLASSIFICATION PROBLEM
53
also give the background, at least historically, for the definition of the
Seiberg–Witten invariants of 4-manifolds.
• Counting. By which we mean invariants defined by “counting” the solu-
tions of suitable elliptic partial differential equations. These can be used
to extend ideas from ordinary differential topology to infinite dimensional
situations, for example in the manner in which one defined the degree
of a smooth map f : S
p
→ S
p
by counting the points in the generic fi-
bre f
−1
(y). “Counting” is a slogan here, since in reality one has to take
account of signs, transversality and other technical issues. Examples in-
clude the Casson invariant which counts flat connections over a 3-manifold
(or equivalently conjugacy classes of representations of the fundamental
group), and Gromov–Witten invariants which count holomorphic curves
and are related to classical enumerative questions in algebraic geometry.
• ∂
2
= 0. By which we mean the idea of Floer producing a chain com-
plex from geometric data whose homology yields “topological invariants”.
These constructions can often be interpreted formally as computing the
“middle dimensional” homology of an infinite dimensional space. Exam-
ples include Floer’s original theories for 3-manifolds and Lagrangian inter-
sections in symplectic manifolds, and many later developments growing
from his idea.
Note that the geometry and topology of infinite dimensional spaces is a theme
running through all these three items, and makes the pervasive interaction with
Quantum Field Theory very natural. The infinite dimensional spaces in question
are generally either spaces of G-connections over a manifold, for a Lie group G, or
spaces of maps from one manifold—often a circle or Riemann surface—to another.
One unifying concept is that of a “topological field theory” [3] by which one expects
a theory that yields numerical invariants of manifolds in some dimension n may
generate structures which assign vector spaces (such as Floer groups) to manifolds
in dimension (n
− 1), categories to manifolds of dimension (n − 2) and yet more
esoteric structures in still lower dimensions [33].
Bringing order into this profusion, and understanding the precise connections
between all these developments is an outstanding problem in mathematics today.
Some connections are well-established and almost obvious; for example the Casson
invariant of a 3-manifold can be viewed as the Euler characteristic of the Floer
homology. Other connections are well-established but much deeper: for example
Taubes’ relation SW
⇔ Gr [42] between the Seiberg–Witten invariants of a sym-
plectic 4-manifold and the Gromov–Witten invariants defined by counting holomor-
phic curves using a choice of compatible almost-complex structure. (Note that the
Seiberg–Witten equation depends on a Riemannian metric g while the holomor-
phic curve equations use an almost complex structure I: the passage between them
makes essential use of a symplectic form ω, although this form does not appear
explicitly in either equation.) In other cases there are well-established conjectures
which are not completely proved, for example in the case of the Seiberg–Witten and
Yang–Mills instanton invariants. In other cases there are clear hints of some rela-
tionship although the picture is still mysterious: for example in the case of Seidel
and Smith’s work [41] relating Khovanov homology to the the symplectic version
of Floer theory. In other cases still it seems very unclear what the final picture will

54
S. K. DONALDSON
be—for example in relating the Floer theories of 3-manifolds based on Yang–Mills
instantons and on the Seiberg–Witten equations.
5. A selection of notable results, questions and developments
Lacking the space for a systematic overview, we will present in this section a
number of topics, many—but not all— involving very recent work, hoping to give
some picture of the field. The author is particularly grateful to Ivan Smith for
tutorials on these more recent developments.
5.1. Successes of invariants in 4 dimensions. Since 1984 the new invari-
ants have been used to distinguish many smooth 4-manifolds which appear identical
from the point of view of classical algebraic topology. We will restrict attention to
simply connected, oriented 4-manifolds. In this case there are just three “classi-
cal” invariants: the integers b
+
2
, b

2
giving the dimensions of positive and negative
subspaces for the intersection form and the “parity” w which is 0 or 1 according
as the intersection form is an even form or an odd form. (Thus the sum b
+
2
+ b

2
is equal to the second number b
2
= dimH
2
and the parity is 0 if and only if the
Stiefel-Whitney class w
2
vanishes.) The examples we refer to above are of pairs
M
1
, M
2
with these same values of b
+
2
, b

2
and parity which can be shown not to be
diffeomorphic. Such a wealth of examples is now known that there is little point
in collecting more without some special feature. One subject of investigation has
been the “geography problem” of which values of (b
+
2
, b

2
, w) are realised by dis-
tinct 4-manifolds. In particular there is interest in searching for “small” examples,
where “small” means with a small second Betti number. For 15 years the record
was held by Kotschick [26], who gave examples with b
+
2
= 1, b

2
= 8. In fact
Kotschick’s examples are complex algebraic surfaces and the distinction between
them, as smooth 4-manifolds, is related to the fact that they have different Kodaira
dimension, as complex surfaces. In 2005, J. Park [40] constructed examples with
b
+
2
= 1, b

2
= 7. Although it is not known whether these manifolds are complex
surfaces, techniques from complex geometry play a major role in his construction.
He started with a complex surface containing a special configuration of rational
curves (i.e., 2-spheres) and then applied a “rational blow-down” construction, due
to Fintushel and Stern [13], to remove the homology classes represented by these
curves. In some situations the rational blow-down has a complex geometry inter-
pretation in terms of smoothings of a singular surface, but the construction makes
sense at the topological level even when this smoothing is obstructed. Since Park’s
breakthrough there has been rapid progress in the construction of steadily smaller
examples. Some of these give new examples of complex algebraic surfaces [31], and
have independent interest for algebraic geometers. Akmedov and Park [2] and inde-
pendently Fintushel and Stern [15] have constructed examples with b
2
+
= 1, b
2

= 2.
Further progress seems likely, but the verification that the manifolds constructed
are simply connected is often a very delicate issue.
5.1.1. Questions which appear out of reach. Despite the abundance of cases
indicated above in which we can distinguish smooth 4-manifolds, there are also
many pairs of manifolds M
1
, M
2
which we suspect to be distinct but which escape
the current methods. One well-known case is that of Horikawa surfaces. Here
we start with the complex quadric surface which is the product S
2
× S
2
. For
each l there is a Hirzebruch surface Σ
2l
which is a ruled surface fibering over S
2
with fibre S
2
, diffeomorphic but not biholomorphic to S
2
× S
2
. There is a section

INVARIANTS OF MANIFOLDS AND THE CLASSIFICATION PROBLEM
55
Δ of Σ
2l
→ S
2
which is an embedded sphere of self-intersection
−2l. We take
M
1
to be a double cover of S
2
× S
2
branched over a curve of bi-degree (6, 12)
and take M
2
to be the double cover of Σ
6
branched over the union of Δ and
another, disjoint, curve C in Σ
6
. If the homology class of C is chosen correctly,
then M
1
and M
2
are homeomorphic but it is known from algebraic geometry that
they are not “deformation equivalent”–i.e., they cannot be placed in the same
connected moduli space of complex structures. The question is whether M
1
, M
2
are diffeomorphic. In this situation general facts from Seiberg–Witten theory show
that those invariants cannot distinguish the manifolds and at present there are
no other tools to apply. We simply do not know the answer. It is quite possible
that these manifolds are diffeomorphic, and perhaps this will be established by
the application of sufficient insight and ingenuity. A related situation arises in
the work of Catanese and Wajnryb [7] who show that certain (simply connected)
iterated branched covers of S
2
× S
2
which are not deformation equivalent are, in
fact, diffeomorphic. Their proof uses an analysis of deformations of a singular
surface. There is a variant of the question in which one asks whether M
1
, M
2
are
symplectomorphic (with their natural symplectic structures), and, while there are
some techniques that can in principle be applied here, the problem seems far out
of reach [5]. Again there is a parallel question for iterated covers which has been
studied in detail by Catanese, L¨
onne and Wajnryb [8] but the complete answer is
not yet clear.
Other well-known instances where we are unable to distinguish 4-manifolds
are provided by work of Fintushel and Stern [14]. They start from a knot K in
the 3-sphere and a K3 surface M containing a 2-torus T with a trivial tubular
neighbourhood. Then they construct another manifold M
K
by cutting out the
torus neighbourhood and gluing in the product S
1
× (S
3
\ K). They show that the
Seiberg–Witten invariants of M
K
capture precisely the Alexander polynomial of
K, while M
K
is always homeomorphic to M . Thus, since we can easily write down
knots with different Alexander polynomials, we get hordes of mutually distinct
smooth 4-manifolds homeomorphic to the K3 surface. One the other hand we can
write down non-trivial knots whose Alexander polynomials vanish. Then we get
manifolds with the same Seiberg–Witten invariants as the K3 surface but we rather
suspect that they are not diffeomorphic. But again we have no tools to establish
this, and perhaps little reason to believe the answer should go one way or the other.
The best-known open problem in 4-manifold theory is probably the four-dimen-
sional smooth Poincar´
e conjecture: which, after Freedman, is the question whether
there is a manifold M homeomorphic but not diffeomorphic to S
4
. For some time
this seemed inaccessible since the “new” 4-manifold invariants rely on non-trivial
second homology. But there is interesting recent work of Freedman, Gompf, Mor-
rison and Walker who show that a certain invariant defined by Rasmussen, arising
from Khovanov homology, could potentially detect counterexamples (i.e., exotic
spheres). Freedman et al. report on extensive computer calculations, but some
promising candidates for counterexamples were shown to be standard by Akbulut.
Rather than speculate about the truth of the smooth Poincare conjecture let us
just note two facts that seem vaguely relevant.
• The work of Bauer and Furuta [6] shows that more subtle information
can sometimes be squeezed, with great profit, from the Seiberg–Witten
equations.

56
S. K. DONALDSON
• At one time there appeared to be the possibility of disproving the 3-
dimensional Poincar´
e conjecture using the Rohlin invariant which, from
its definition, did not obviously vanish on homotopy spheres. Showing
that, in fact, this scheme would not work was the original motivation
for Casson’s introduction of his invariant. Casson proved that his invari-
ant reduces modulo 2 to the Rohlin invariant but it clearly vanishes on
homotopy spheres.
5.2. A small corner where there is a complete classification. The,
possibly gloomy, conclusion in the previous subsection is that any kind of systematic
understanding of smooth 4-manifolds seems a long way off. Thus it is very satisfying
to have complete results even under limiting hypotheses. The only such result
known to the author occurs in the discussion of compact symplectic 4-manifolds.
Given a symplectic form ω on M we have two basic topological invariants
• The de Rham cohomology class [ω] ∈ H
2
(M, R).
• The first Chern class c
1
∈ H
2
(M ; Z) which can be defined by choosing
any compatible almost-complex structure on M .
Thus if M is a compact 4-manifold we get a numerical invariant from the cup prod-
uct c
1
.ω = c
1
∪ [ω], [M] and in particular we have a “sign” +, 0, − depending on
whether this number is positive, zero or negative. This number is loosely connected
with the sign of curvature in Riemannian geometry: in the K¨


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-series-of-the-111.html

the-series-of-the-116.html

the-series-of-the-13.html

the-series-of-the-18.html

the-series-of-the-22.html