1 ... 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 22

bet22/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
5. Symplectic curvature flow
Symplectic 4-manifolds form a very important class of 4-manifolds and include

ahler surfaces as special cases. It will be desirable to extend what we have about
Ricci flow on K¨
ahler surfaces to symplectic 4-manifolds. But the Ricci flow does
not preserve the symplectic structure, so we need a new flow for studying symplecic
manifolds. Fortunately, J. Streets and I found a new curvature flow for symplectic
manifolds, see [StT10].
Let (M, ω) be a symplectic manifold. An almost-K¨
ahler metric g on M is a
Riemannian metric such that
g(u, v) = ω(u, J v), ω(J u, J v) = ω(u, v),
where J is an almost complex structure. Such a triple (M, ω, J ) is called an almost

ahler.
Besides the Levi-Civita connection
∇, there is another canonical connection,
called Chern connection, given by
D
X
Y =

X
Y

1
2
J (

X
J )(Y ).
The Chern connection D preserves the metric g and almost complex structure J ,
but it may have torsion.
The Chern connection D induces a Hermitian connection on the anticanonical
bundle, and we denote the curvature form of this connection by P . Alternatively,
if Ω =

ijkl
} denotes the curvature of D, one has
(5.1)
P
ij
= ω
kl
Ω
ijkl
,
where

ij
} is the inverse of ω. By the general Chern-Weil theory, P is a closed
form and represents πc
1
(M, J ).
Define an endomorphism
(5.2)
R
j
i
= J
k
i
Ric
j
k
− Ric
k
i
J
j
k

154
GANG TIAN
where the index on the Ricci tensor has been raised with respect to the associ-
ated metric. This
R is actually the (2,0)+(0,2) part of the Ricci curvature of the
associated metric.
The symplectic curvature flow in [StT10] is given by
(5.3)

dt
=
−2P and
dJ
dt
=
−2g
−1
P
(2,0)+(0,2)
+
R.
A direct computation shows:
(5.4)
g
−1
P
(2,0)+(0,2)
=
1
2
[


∇J − N ] ,
where
(5.5)
N
a
b
= g
ij
J
a
c

i
J
p
b

j
J
c
p
.
It follows that (5.3) can be written as
(5.6)

dt
=
−2P and
dJ
dt
=
−∇

∇J + N + R.
Clearly, (5.3) is invariant under diffeomorphisms of M , hence, like the Ricci
flow, this symplectic curvature flow is parabolic only modulo the group of diffeo-
morphism. More precisely, we have
Theorem
5.1. Let (M, ω
0
, J
0
) be an almost K¨
ahler manifold. There exists a
unique solution to ( 5.3) with initial condition (ω
0
, J
0
) on [0, T ) for some T > 0.
Our new flow resembles the Ricci flow. In terms of associated metrics g(t), the
flow becomes
(5.7)
∂g
∂t
=
−2 Ric(g) + B
1
+ B
2
,
where
B
1
ij
= g
kl
g
pq

i
J
p
k

j
J
q
l
and B
2
ij
= g
kl
g
pq

k
J
p
i

l
J
q
j
.
Like the Ricci flow, one can derive induced evolution equations on the curvature
Rm(g) of g and its derivatives as well as derivatives of J and apply the Maximum
Principle to proving that if for some fixed α depending only on ω
0
,
sup
M
×[0,α/K]
Rm(g),  ≤ K,
then we have
sup
M
×[0,α/K]
,  ≤ C
m
Kt

m
2
.
However, in dimension 4, we have a much better estimate:
Theorem
5.2. If dim M = 4 and (ω(t), J (t)) is a solution to (5.3) on [0, T ]
satisfying
sup
M
×[0,T ]
|Rm| = K,
then there exists a constant C(K, ω(0), J (0), T ) such that
sup
M
×[0,T ]
(
|∇J|
2
+
|∇
2
J
|) ≤ C.

GEOMETRIC ANALYSIS ON 4-MANIFOLDS
155
It follows that whenever the curvature of g(t) is bounded, so are all the deriva-
tives of the curvature and J (t), in other words, the deviation of J from being
parallel or integrable is controlled by the curvature. We expect that all finite-time
singularities of (5.3) are modeled on K¨
ahler spaces, more precisely, we expect
Conjecture
5.3. The maximum existence time for (5.3) is given by
(5.8)
T = sup
 [ω
0
]
− tπc
1
(M ) is represented by a sympletic form
.
Moreover, if T <
∞, then there will be a holomorphic 2-sphere C ⊂ M of self-
intersection number greater than
−2 along which [ω
0
]
− tπc
1
(M ) vanishes.
This conjecture implies that all finite-time singularities are caused by holomor-
phic 2-spheres of self-intersection number greater than
−2. Clearly, (5.3) cannot
have a solution at or beyond T , the problem is whether or not there is a solution up
to T . As one expects, if J
0
is integrable, so is J (t) and (5.3) becomes the K¨
ahler-
Ricci flow. In this case, the conjecture is indeed true as shown by Tian–Zhang in
[TZ06]. We also know exactly how the flow behaves at time
∞ for K¨ahler metrics
as shown at the end of last section.
We expect that the flow (5.3) exhibits a picture for symplectic 4-manifolds
similar to the one for K¨
ahler surfaces. First we point out that the static solutions
of (5.3) are classified. By a static solution, we mean an almost K¨
ahler metric (ω, J )
satisfying:
P = λ ω, 2 P
(2,0)+(0,2)
= g
· R,
where λ is a constant. These are equivalent to P = λ ω and
R = 0. It follows from
a result of Apostolov et al (see [StT10], Section 9) that the latter system has only

ahler-Einstein metrics as solutions on a closed 4-manifold. Therefore, all static
solutions are K¨
ahler-Einstein metrics.
In view of this and what we know about K¨
ahler-Ricci flow, we may hope that
(5.3) has only finitely many finite-time singularities which are caused by holomor-
phic 2-spheres of self-intersection number >
−2 and thereafter becomes either ex-
tinct, or has a global solution; if (5.3) become extinct at finite time, then the un-
derlying 4-manifold is essentially a rational surface; if (5.3) has a global solution,
then after appropriate normalization, the solution converges to a sum of K¨
ahler–
Einstein surfaces and symplectic 4-manifolds which admit a fiberation over a lower
dimensional space with k-dimensional tori as generic fibers, where 1
≤ k ≤ 4, glued
along 3-dimensional tori with appropriate properties.
This is analogous to Thurston’s Geometrization Conjecture for 3-manifolds.
6. Pluri-closed flow
The Ricci flow has another generalization: the pluri-closed flow on Hermitian
manifolds. This flow provides solutions of the B-field renormalization group flow in
theoretical physics, but it is not exactly a case of the B-field renormalization group
flow since the latter does not say anything about how complex structures evolve.
Let (M, J ) be a complex manifold of complex dimension n and ω be a Hermitian
metric on M . We denote a Hermitian metric by its K¨
ahler form ω. We say a
Hermitian metric ω pluri-closed if
(6.1)
∂ ¯
∂ω = 0 .
This condition is weaker than the K¨
ahler condition. By a result of Gauduchon,
every complex surface admits pluri-closed metrics.

156
GANG TIAN
The pluri-closed flow is given by
(6.2)
∂ω
∂t
= ∂∂

ω + ¯
∂ ¯


ω +

−1
2
∂ ¯
∂ log det g .
This was introduced by Streets and myself in 2008, see [StT09]. It was proved
there that for any pluri-closed metric ω
0
on M , there is a unique solution ω(t) for
(6.2) on [0, T ) for some T > 0 such that ω(0) = ω
0
; moreover, all ω(t) staisfy pluri-
closed condition. If ω
0
is K¨
ahler, so is ω(t), so this flow reduces to the K¨
ahler-Ricci
flow.
A newer and better formulation of (6.2) is to use the Bismut connection. Recall
the Bismut connection
∇ is defined as follows:
(6.3)
g(

X
Y, Z) = g(D
X
Y, Z) +
1
2
dω(J X, J Y, J Z),
where D denotes the Levi-Civita connection. The Bismut connection can be char-
acterized as the unique connection compatible with both g and J such that the
torsion is a three-form. In terms of the Bismut connection, this torsion 3-form is
closed if and only if ω is pluriclosed. Note that when ω is not closed, the Bismut
connection is different from the Chern connection. Let Ω denote the curvature of
the Bismut connection
∇, and let P denote the curvature of the induced connection
on the canonical bundle, i.e., P
ab
= ω
ij
Ω
abij
. Then (6.2) becomes
(6.4)
∂ω
∂t
=
− P
1,1
,
where P
1,1
denotes the (1,1)-component of P . Using this formulation, it is proved
in [StT11] that for any initial ω, (6.4) has a solution ω(t) on [0, T ) such that either
T =
∞ or |P
1,1
(ω(t))
| blows up as t tends to T . This is analogous to Sesum’s result
for Ricci flow [Se05].
Another consequence of this new formulation is to enable us to relate (6.2), or
equivalently (6.4), to the B-field renormalization group flow of string theory. Recall
the B-field flow studied in [OSW06]:
(6.5)
∂g
ij
∂t
=
−2 Rc
ij
+
1
2
T
pq
i
T
jpq
and
∂T
∂t
= Δ
LB
T ,
where T is a 3-form and Δ
LB
denotes the Laplace-Beltrami operator of the time-
dependent metric. It is shown in [OSW06] that the system (6.5) is the gradient
flow of the following Perelman-type functional
(6.6)
λ(g, T ) = inf
M
R

1
12
T
2
+ f
2
e
−f
dV
M
e
−f
dV = 1
.
Now let ω(t) be a solution to (6.2) by pluri-closed metrics on a complex manifold
M with complex structure J . Denote by T (t) the torsion of the Bismut connections
associated to ω(t). It is proved in [StT10] that if X is the time-dependent field
dual to

1
2
J d

ω and φ(t) is the integral curve of X, then (φ

ω, φ

T ) is a solution
of (6.5).
2
This enables us to obtain two monotonic quantities, one is the functional
λ, the other is an expanding entropy (see [StT11]).
It is a difficult yet significant problem to study the long-time existence of (6.2).
In view of progress on K¨
ahler-Ricci flow, especially, the sharp existence theorem
2
Note that complex structures φ(t)

J vary in t, so it is highly unclear how a solution of (6.5)
goes back to that of the pluri-closed flow since (6.5) does not tell how complex structures vary.

GEOMETRIC ANALYSIS ON 4-MANIFOLDS
157
of Zhang–Tian [TZ06], we expect the following: first we note that a pluri-closed
metric defines a class in the finite dimensional Aeppli cohomology group
(6.7)
H
1,1
∂+ ¯

=
{Ker∂ ¯∂ : Λ
1,1
R
→ Λ
2,2
R
}
 γ ∈ Λ
0,1

.
Define the space
P
∂+ ¯

to be the cone of the classes in
H
∂+ ¯

which contain pluri-
closed metrics.
Conjecture
6.1. Let (M, ω
0
, J ) be a compact complex manifold with a pluri-
closed metric ω
0
. Define
(6.8)
τ

:= sup
t
≥0
 [ω
0
− tc
1
]
∈ P
∂+ ¯

.
Then the solution to ((6.2)) with initial condition ω
0
exists on [0, τ

), and τ

is the
maximal time of existence.
A positive resolution of Conjecture 6.1 would have geometric consequences for
non-K¨
ahler surfaces. This is because one can characterize the cone
P
∂+ ¯

in a rather
easy way (see [StT11]). Combining this with the fact that every complex surface is
pluri-closed, we can use (6.2) to study geometry and topology of complex surfaces,
particularly, the still largely mysterious Class VII
+
surfaces. Class VII
+
surfaces
are those minimal compact complex surfaces with Betti number b
1
= 1 and b
2
> 0.
In fact, we can show that the resolution of Conjecture 6.1 implies the classification
of Class VII
+
surfaces with b
2
= 1, a result recently obtained by Teleman by using
gauge theory [Te10]. We believe that through a finer analysis of limiting solutions
of (6.2), we can expect to deduce a full classification of all Class VII
+
surfaces from
the above conjecture.
Recently, through the correspondence between our pluri-closed and the B-field
flow, J. Streets and I show that the B-field flow preserves the generalized K¨
ahler
structures which were introduced by N. Hitchin [Hi11]. Therefore, our pluri-closed
flow can be also used to studying generalized K¨
ahler manifolds.
7. Einstein 4-manifolds
In this section, we discuss some estimates for Einstein metrics on 4-manifolds.
This is a step in my program with Cheeger on completely understanding how Ein-
stein metrics develop a singularity [CT06]. This section as well as the next two
follow corresponding sections in [Ti06].
Consider the normalized Einstein equation
(7.1)
Ric(g) = λg,
where the Einstein constant λ is
−3, 0 or 3, and, if λ = 0, we add the additional
normalization that the volume is equal to 1.
The first main result in our program is the following;
Theorem
7.1. [CT06] ( -regularity.) There exist uniform constants
> 0,
c > 0, such that the following holds: If g is a solution to ( 7.1) and B
r
(p) is a
geodesic ball of radius r
≤ 1 satisfying:
(7.2)
B
r
(p)
|Rm(g)|
2
≤ ,

158
GANG TIAN
then
(7.3)
sup
B
1
2
r
(p)
|Rm(g)| ≤ c · r
−2
,
where Rm(g) denotes the sectional curvature of g.
Remark
7.2. If λ = 0, we can drop the assumption r
≤ 1. In particular, it
implies that a complete Ricci-flat 4-manifold with finite L
2
-norm of curvature has
quadratic curvature decay.
The usual -regularity theorems for Yang-Mills and harmonic maps can be
proved by the Moser iteration using the Sobolev inequality.
Since the domain
involved is effectively a standard ball, the Sobolev inequality holds. In [An89],
[Na88], [Ti89], this Moser iteration argument was applied to Einstein 4-manifolds
and a version of Theorem 7.1 was proved under the assumption that the L
2
-norm
of the curvature is sufficiently small against the Sobolov constant.
The proof of Theorem 7.1 is considerably more difficult than those of the ear-
lier -regularity theorems and employs entirely different techniques. Also, as a
consequence of our -regularity, we know essentially the topology of the geodesic
ball B
r/2
(p), that is, it is essentially a quotient of an euclidean ball by Euclidean
isometries. This also tells a difference between our theorem and previous ones
for Yang–Mills etc.: we determine the topology as well as analytic property of the
geodesic ball considered at the same time.
The second main result in our program gives an estimate on the injectivity
radius.
Theorem
7.3. [CT06](Lower Bound on Injectivity Radius.) For any δ > and
v > 0, there exists w = w(v, δ, χ) > 0, such that if (M, g) is a complete Einstein
4-manifold with L
2
-norm of curvature equal to 12π
2
χ
3
, vol(M, g)
≥ v and λ = ±3,
then the set S
w
of p
∈ M where the injectivity radius at p is less than w has measure
less than δ.
The proof for both theorems above is based on an effective version of Chern’s
transgression for the Gauss–Bonnet–Chern formula for the Euler number. Let P
χ
be the Gauss–Bonnet–Chern form. On subsets of Riemannian manifolds which
are sufficiently collapsed with locally bounded curvature, there is an essentially
canonical transgression form
T P
χ
, satisfying
d
T P
χ
= P
χ
, and
|T P
χ
| ≤ c(4) · (r
|Rm|
(p))
−3
,
where r
|Rm|
(p) is the supremum of those r such that the curvature Rm is bounded
by 1/r
2
on B
r
(p). In fact, this can be done for any dimensions. However, if (M, g)
is an Einstein 4-manifold, we have
(7.4)
P
χ
=
1

2
· |R|
2
· dV.
It follows that near those points where (M, g) is sufficiently collapsed with locally
bounded curvature, local L
2
-norm of curvature for g can be controlled by the curva-
ture on the boundary in a weaker norm. Then the above theorems can be deduced
by applying this estimate. We refer the readers to [CT06] for details.
3
If M is compact, χ is just the Euler number of M .

GEOMETRIC ANALYSIS ON 4-MANIFOLDS
159
If g(t) is a global solution of the normalized Ricci flow:
(7.5)
∂g
∂t
=
−2(Ric(g) −
r
4
g),
where r denotes the integral of scalar curvature. Then the volume of g(t) stays as a
constant. We expect that the curvature and injectivity radius estimates in [CT06]
hold for g(t) as t goes to
∞.
The above theorems can be used to construct a compactifcation of moduli of
Einstein 4-manifolds (see [CT06] for more details).
Denote by
M(λ, χ, v) the moduli of all solutions to (7.1) with volume equal to
v and such that the underlying manifold is closed and has the Euler number χ. This
moduli is usually non-compact. We would like to give a natural compactification
analogous to the Deligne-Mumford compactification of Riemann surfaces of genus
greater than 1.
Let (M
i
, g
i
) be a sequence of Einstein 4-manifolds with fixed Euler number,
Einstein constant and volume. Let y
i
∈ M
i
be a sequence of base points. After
passing to a subsequence if necessary, there is a limit (M

, y

) of the sequence
(M
i
, g
i
, y
i
) in a suitable weak geometric sense, the pointed Gromov-Hausdorff sense.
This limit space can be thought of as a weakly Einstein spaces with singularities,
although a priori they are length spaces and might not have any smooth points
whatsoever. Our program provides understanding of the smooth structure of this
limit space in general cases.
If λ = 3, then the diameter of (M, g) in
M(λ, χ, v) is uniformly bounded. It is
a non-collapsing case. It has been known since the late 80’s that the limit M

is an
Einstein orbifold with isolated singularities and that (M
i
, g
i
) converges to M

in
the Cheeger-Gromov topology
4
, see [An89], [Na88], and [Ti89] in the K¨
ahler case.
As a consequence, the moduli can be compactified by adding Einstein 4-dimensional
orbifolds with isolated singularities.
If λ =
−3, the diameter for a sequence of Einstein metrics can diverge to ∞.
It is crucial to bound the injectivity radius uniformly from below at almost every
point in order to have a fine structure for the limit M

. Using Theorem 7.1 and
7.3, in [CT06], Cheeger and I proved the following
Theorem
7.4. Let (M
i
, g
i
) be a sequence of Einstein 4-manifolds in
M(−3, χ, v). Then by taking a subsequence if necessary, there is a sequence of
N -tuples (y
i,1
,
· · · , y
i,N
) satisfying:
1. N is bounded by a constant depending only on χ;
2. y
i,α
∈ M
i
and for any distinct α, β, lim
i
→∞
d
g
i
(y
i,α
, y
i,β
) =
∞;
3. For each 1
≤ α ≤ N, in the Cheeger-Gromov topology, (M
i
, g
i
, y
i,α
)
converges to a complete Einstein orbifold (M
∞,α
, g
∞,α
, y
∞,α
) with only
finitely many isolated quotient singularities and lim
i
→∞
y
i,α
= y
∞,α
;
4. lim
i
→∞
vol(M
i
, g
i
) = vol(M

, g

), where
M

=
α
M
∞,α
and g
∞ M
∞,α
= g
∞,α
.
If λ = 0, the sequence (M
i
, g
i
) can collapse, i.e., the injectivity radius can go
uniformly to 0. We can scale the metrics g
i
such that (M
i
, μ
i
g
i
) has diameter 1.
4
This means that for any
> 0, there is a compact subset K of the smooth part of M

and
diffeomorphisms φ
i
from a neighborhood of K into M
i
such that M
i

i
(K) has measure less than
and φ

i
g
i
converges to the Einstein orbifold metric of M

in the smooth topology.

160
GANG TIAN
Then by taking a subsequence, this has a limit M

in the Gromov–Hausdorff
topology. Moreover, by Theorem 7.1, the curvature of g
i
is uniformly bounded
outside finitely many points, so one has some understanding of the topology of M
i
compared to that of M

.
It remains to understand collapsing limits of Einstein 4-manifolds. More pre-
cisely, if (M
i
, g
i
, x
i
) converges to a collapsed limit (Y, d) in the Gromov–Hausdorff
topology, where d is a metric inducing the length structure on Y . This includes
two cases:
1. When λ = 0, the diameter is uniformly bounded;
2. When λ =
−1, x
i
diverges to infinity from any points where the local
volume is bounded from below.


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-secrets-of-anna.html

the-selfie-a-window-into.html

the-septenary-sephira---.html

the-series-of-the-102.html

the-series-of-the-107.html