1 ... 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 16

bet16/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
= π
n
+N
(S
N
), N >> n (and called the image of the
J -homomorphism π
n
(SO(∞)) → π
st
n
). The order of J
n
is 1 or 2 for n
≠ 4k − 1; if
n
= 4k − 1, then the order of J
n
equals the denominator of
∣B
2k
/4k∣, where B
2k
is
the Bernoulli number. The first non-trivial J are
J
1
= Z
2
, J
3
= Z
24
, J
7
= Z
240
, J
8
= Z
2
, J
9
= Z
2
and J
11
= Z
504
.
In general, the homotopy classes of maps f such that the f -pullback of a generic
point is diffeomorphic to a given homotopy sphere Σ
n
, make a J
n
-coset in the stable
homotopy group π
st
n
. Thus the correspondence Σ
n
↝ f defines a map from the set

n
} of the diffeomorphism classes of homotopy spheres to the factor group π
st
n
/J
n
,
say μ
∶ {Σ
n
} → π
st
n
/J
n
.
The map μ (which, by the above, is surjective for n
≠ 2, 6, 14, 30, 62, 126) is
finite-to-one for n
≠ 4, where the proof of this finiteness for n ≥ 5 depends on Smale’s
h-cobordism theorem, (see section 8). In fact, the homotopy n-spheres make an
Abelian group (n
≠ 4) under the connected sum operation Σ
1

2
(see next section)
and, by applying surgery to manifolds Θ
n
+1
with boundaries Σ
n
, where these Θ
n
+1

118
MIKHAIL GROMOV
(unlike the above Milnor’s Θ
8
) come as pullbacks of generic points under smooth
maps from (n
+ N + 1)-balls B
n
+N+1
to S
N
, Kervaire and Milnor show that
(☀) μ ∶ {Σ
n
} → π
st
n
/J
n
is a homomorphism with a finite (n
≠ 4) kernel denoted
B
n
+1
⊂ {Σ
n
} which is a cyclic group.
(The homotopy spheres Σ
n
∈ B
n
+1
bound
(n + 1)-manifolds with trivial tangent
bundles.)
Moreover,
(⋆) The kernel B
n
+1
of μ is zero for n
= 2m ≠ 4.
If n
+1 = 4k +2, then B
n
+1
is either zero or
Z
2
, depending on the Kervaire invariant:
(⋆) If n equals 1, 5, 13, 29, 61 and, possibly, 125, then B
n
+1
is zero, and
B
n
+1
= Z
2
for the rest of n
= 4k + 1.
(⋆) If n = 4k − 1, then the cardinality (order) of B
n
+1
equals 2
2k
−2
(2
2k
−1
− 1)
times the numerator of
∣4B
2k
/k∣, where B
2k
is the Bernoulli number.
The above and the known results on the stable homotopy groups π
st
n
imply, for
example, that there are no exotic spheres for n
= 5, 6, there are 28 mutually non-
diffeomorphic homotopy 7-spheres, there are 16 homotopy 18-spheres and 523264
mutually non-diffeomorphic homotopy 19-spheres.
By Perelman, there is a single smooth structure on the homotopy 3 sphere and
the case n
= 4 remains open. (Yet, every homotopy 4-sphere is homeomorphic to
S
4
by Freedman’s solution of the 4D-Poincar´
e conjecture.)
7. Isotopies and Intersections
Besides constructing, listing and classifying manifolds X one wants to under-
stand the topology of spaces of maps X
→ Y .
The space
[X→Y ]
smth
of all C

maps carries little geometric load by itself
since this space is homotopy equivalent to
[X→Y ]
cont
(inuous)
.
An analyst may be concerned with completions of
[X→Y ]
smth
, e.g. with Sobolev’s
topologies while a geometer is keen to study geometric structures, e.g. Riemannian
metrics on this space.
But from a differential topologist’s point of view the most interesting is the
space of smooth embeddings F
∶ X → Y which diffeomorphically send X onto a
smooth submanifold X

= f(X) ⊂ Y .
If dim
(Y ) > 2 dim(X) then generic f are embeddings, but, in general, you can
not produce them at will so easily. However, given such an embedding f
0
∶ X → Y ,
there are plenty of smooth homotopies, called (smooth) isotopies f
t
, t
∈ [0, 1], of it
which remain embeddings for every t and which can be obtained with the following
Theorem
(Thom, 1954). Let Z
⊂ X be a compact smooth submanifold (bound-
ary is allowed) and f
0
∶ X → Y is an embedding, where the essential case is where
X
⊂ Y and f
0
is the identity map.
Then every isotopy of Z
f
0
→ Y can be extended to an isotopy of all of X. More
generally, the restriction map R
∣Z
∶ [X→Y ]
emb
→ [Z→Y ]
emb
is a fibration; in par-
ticular, the isotopy extension property holds for an arbitrary family of embeddings
X
→ Y parametrized by a compact space.
This is similar to the homotopy extension property (mentioned in section 1) for
spaces of continuous maps X
→ Y —the “geometric” cornerstone of the algebraic
topology.)

MANIFOLDS
119
The proof easily reduces with the implicit function theorem to the case, where
X
= Y and dim(Z) = dim(W ).
Since diffeomorphisms are open in the space of all smooth maps, one can extend
“small” isotopies, those which only slightly move Z, and since diffeomorphisms
of Y make a group, the required isotopy is obtained as a composition of small
diffeomorphisms of Y . (The details are easy.)
Both “open” and “group” are crucial: for example, homotopies by locally dif-
feomorphic maps, say of a disk B
2
⊂ S
2
to S
2
do not extend to S
2
whenever a map
B
2
→ S
2
starts overlapping itself. Also it is much harder (yet possible, [12], [40])
to extend topological isotopies, since homeomorphisms are, by no means, open in
the space of all continuous maps.
For example if dim
(Y ) ≥ 2 dim(Z) + 2. then a generic smooth homotopy of
Z is an isotopy: Z does not, generically, cross itself as it moves in Y (unlike, for
example, a circle moving in the 3-space where self-crossings are stable under small
perturbations of homotopies). Hence, every generic homotopy of Z extends to a
smooth isotopy of Y .
Mazur Swindle and Hauptvermutung. Let U
1
, U
2
be compact n-manifolds
with boundaries and f
12
∶ U
1
→ U
2
and f
21
∶ U
2
→ U
1
be embeddings which land in
the interiors of their respective target manifolds.
Let W
1
and W
2
be the unions (inductive limits) of the infinite increasing se-
quences of spaces
W
1
= U
1

f
12
U
2

f
21
U
1

f
12
U
2

f
12
...
and
W
2
= U
2

f
21
U
1

f
12
U
2

f
12
U
1

f
12
...
Observe that W
1
and W
2
are open manifolds without boundaries and that they
are diffeomorphic since dropping the first term in a sequence U
1
⊂ U
2
⊂ U
3
⊂ ... does
not change the union.
Similarly, both manifolds are diffeomorphic to the unions of the sequences
W
11
= U
1

f
11
U
1

f
11
... and W
22
= U
2

f
22
U
2

f
22...
for
f
11
= f
12
○ f
21
∶ U
1
→ U
1
and f
22
= f
21
○ f
12
∶ U
2
→ U
2
.
If the self-embedding f
11
is isotopic to the identity map, then W
11
is diffeomor-
phic to the interior of U
1
by the isotopy theorem and the same applies to f
22
(or
any self-embedding for this matter).
Thus we conclude with the above, that, for example, the following holds.
Open normal neighbourhoods U
op
1
and U
op
2
of two homotopy
equivalent n-manifolds (and triangulated spaces in general) Z
1
and Z
2
in
R
n
+N
, N
≥ n + 2, are diffeomorphic (Mazur 1961).
Anybody might have guessed that the “open” condition is a pure technicality and
everybody believed so until Milnor’s 1961 counterexample to the Hauptvermutung—
the main conjecture of the combinatorial topology.
Milnor has shown that there are two free isometric actions A
1
and A
2
of the
cyclic group
Z
p
on the sphere S
3
, for every prime p
≥ 7, such that the quotient
(lens) spaces Z
1
= S
3
/A
1
and Z
2
= S
3
/A
2
are homotopy equivalent, but their closed
normal neighbourhoods U
1
and U
2
in any
R
3
+N
are not diffeomorphic. (This could
not have happened to simply connected manifolds Z
i
by the h-cobordism theorem.)

120
MIKHAIL GROMOV
Moreover, the polyhedra P
1
and P
2
obtained by attaching the cones to the bound-
aries of these manifolds admit no isomorphic simplicial subdivisions. Yet, the inte-
riors U
op
i
of these U
i
, i
= 1, 2, are diffeomorphic for N ≥ 5. In this case, P
1
and P
2
are homeomorphic as the one point compactifications of two homeomorphic spaces
U
op
1
and U
op
2
.
It was previously known that these Z
1
and Z
2
are homotopy equivalent (J. H.
C. Whitehead, 1941); yet, they are combinatorially non-equivalent (Reidemeister,
1936) and, hence, by Moise’s 1951 positive solution of the Hauptvermutung for
3-manifolds, non-homeomorphic.
There are few direct truly geometric constructions of diffeomorphisms, but
those available, are extensively used, e.g. fiberwise linear diffeomorphisms of vector
bundles. Even the sheer existence of the humble homothety of
R
n
, x
↦ tx, combined
with the isotopy theorem, effortlessly yields, for example, the following
Lemma
(
[B→Y ]-Lemma). The space of embeddings f of the n-ball (or R
n
)
into an arbitrary Y
= Y
n
+k
is homotopy equivalent to the space of tangent n-frames
in Y ; in fact the differential f
↦ Df∣0 establishes a homotopy equivalence between
the respective spaces.
For example, there is the following.
The assignment f
↦ J(f)∣0 of the Jacobi matrix at 0 ∈ B
n
is a
homotopy equivalence of the space of embeddings f
∶ B → R
n
to
the linear group GL
(n).
Corollary
(Ball Gluing Lemma). Let X
1
and X
2
be
(n + 1)-dimensional
manifolds with boundaries Y
1
and Y
2
, let B
1
⊂ Y
1
be a smooth submanifold diffeo-
morphic to the n-ball and let f
∶ B
1
→ B
2
⊂ Y
2
= ∂(A
2
) be a diffeomorphism. If the
boundaries Y
i
of X
i
are connected, the diffeomorphism class of the
(n+1)-manifold
X
3
= X
1
+
f
X
2
obtained by attaching X
1
to X
2
by f and (obviously canonically)
smoothed at the “corner” (or rather the “crease”) along the boundary of B
1
, does
not depend on B
1
and f .
This X
3
is denoted X
1
#

X
2
. For example, this “sum” of balls, B
n
+1
#

B
n
+1
,
is again a smooth
(n + 1)-ball.
Connected Sum. The boundary Y
3
= ∂(X
3
) can be defined without any
reference to X
i
⊃ Y
i
, as follows. Glue the manifolds Y
1
an Y
2
by f
∶ B
1
→ B
2
⊂ Y
2
and then remove the interiors of the balls B
1
and of its f -image B
2
.
If the manifolds Y
i
(not necessarily anybody’s boundaries or even being closed)
are connected, then the resulting connected sum manifold is denoted Y
1
#Y
2
.
Isn’t it a waste of glue? You may be wondering why bother glueing the interiors
of the balls if you are going to remove them anyway. Wouldn’t it be easier first to
remove these interiors from both manifolds and then glue what remains along the
spheres S
n
−1
i
= ∂(B
i
)?
This is easier but also it is also a wrong thing to do: the result may depend
on the diffeomorphism S
n
−1
1
↔ S
n
−1
2
, as it happens for Y
1
= Y
2
= S
7
in Milnor’s
example; but the connected sum defined with balls is unique by the
[B→Y ]-lemma.
The ball gluing operation may be used many times in succession; thus, for
example, one builds “big
(n + 1)-balls” from smaller ones, where this lemma in
lower dimension may be used for ensuring the ball property of the gluing sites.

MANIFOLDS
121
Gluing and Bordisms. Take two closed oriented n-manifold X
1
and X
2
and let
X
1
⊃ U
1

f
U
2
⊂ X
2
be an orientation reversing diffeomorphisms between compact n-dimensional sub-
manifolds U
i
⊂ X
i
, i
= 1, 2 with boundaries. If we glue X
1
and X
2
by f and remove
the (glued together) interiors of U
i
the resulting manifold, say X
3
= X
1
+
−U
X
2
is
naturally oriented and, clearly, it is orientably bordant to the disjoint union of X
1
and X
2
. (This is similar to the geometric/algebraic cancellation of cycles mentioned
in section 4.)
Conversely, one can give an alternative definition of the oriented bordism group
B
o
n
as of the Abelian group generated by oriented n-manifolds with the relations
X
3
= X
1
+ X
2
for all X
3
= X
1
+
−U
X
2
. This gives the same
B
o
n
even if the only U
allowed are those diffeomorphic to S
i
× B
n
−i
as it follows from the handle decom-
positions induced by Morse functions.
The isotopy theorem is not dimension specific, but the following construction
due to Haefliger (1961) generalizing the Whitney Lemma of 1944 demonstrates
something special about isotopies in high dimensions.
Let Y be a smooth n-manifold and X

, X
′′
⊂ Y be smooth closed submanifolds
in general position. Denote Σ
0
= X

∩ X
′′
⊂ Y and let X be the (abstract) disjoint
union of X

and X
′′
. (If X

and X
′′
are connected equividimensional manifolds,
one could say that X is a smooth manifold with its two “connected components”
X

and X
′′
being embedded into Y .)
Clearly,
dim

0
) = n − k

− k
′′
for n
= dim(Y ), n − k

= dim(X

) and n − k
′′
= dim(X
′′
).
Let f
t
∶ X → Y , t ∈ [0, 1], be a smooth generic homotopy which disengages X

from X
′′
, i.e. f
1
(X

) does not intersect f
1
(X
′′
), and let
˜
Σ
= {(x

, x
′′
, t
)}
f
t
(x

)=f
t
(x
′′
)
⊂ X

× X
′′
× [0, 1],
i.e. ˜
Σ consists of the triples
(x

, x
′′
, t
) for which f
t
(x

) = f
t
(x
′′
).
Let Σ
⊂ X

∪ X
′′
be the union S

∪ S
′′
, where S

⊂ X

equals the projection of
˜
Σ to the X

-factor of X

× X
′′
× [0, 1] and S
′′
⊂ X
′′
is the projection of ˜
Σ to X
′′
.
Thus, there is a correspondence x

↔ x
′′
between the points in Σ
= S

∪ S
′′
,
where the two points correspond one to another if x

∈ S

meets x
′′
∈ S
′′
at some
moment t

in the course of the homotopy, i.e.
f
t

(x

) = f
t

(x
′′
) for some t

∈ [0, 1].
Finally, let W
⊂ Y be the union of the f
t
-paths, denoted
[x


t
x
′′
] ⊂ Y , travelled
by the points x

∈ S

⊂ Σ and x
′′
∈ S
′′
⊂ Σ until they meet at some moment t

. In
other words,
[x


t
x
′′
] ⊂ Y consists of the union of the points f
t
(x

) and f
t
(x
′′
)
over t
∈ [0, t

= t

(x

) = t

(x
′′
)] and
W
= ⋃
x

∈S

[x


t
x
′′
] = ⋃
x
′′
∈S
′′
[x


t
x
′′
].
Clearly,
dim
(Σ) = dim(Σ
0
) + 1 = n − k

− k
′′
+ 1 and
dim
(W ) = dim(Σ) + 1 = n − k

− k
′′
+ 2 .

122
MIKHAIL GROMOV
To grasp the picture look at X consisting of a round 2-sphere X

(where k

= 1)
and a round circle X
′′
(where k
′′
= 2) in the Euclidean 3-space Y , where X and X

intersect at two points x
1
, x
2
– our Σ
0
= {x
1
, x
2
} in this case.
When X

an X
′′
move away one from the other by parallel translations in the
opposite directions, their intersection points sweep W which equals the intersection
of the 3-ball bounded by X

and the flat 2-disc spanned by X
′′
. The boundary Σ
of this W consists of two arcs S

⊂ X

and S
′′
⊂ X
′′
, where S

joins x
1
with x
2
in
X

and S
′′
join x
1
with x
2
in X
′′
.
Back to the general case, we want W to be, generically, a smooth submanifold
without double points as well as without any other singularities, except for the
unavoidable corner in its boundary Σ, where S

meet S
′′
along Σ
0
. We need for
this
2 dim
(W ) = 2(n − k

− k
′′
+ 2) < n = dim(Y ) i.e. 2k

+ 2k
′′
> n + 4.
Also, we want to avoid an intersection of W with X

and with X
′′
away from
Σ
= ∂(W ). If we agree that k
′′
≥ k

, this, generically, needs
dim
(W ) + dim(X) = (n − k

− k
′′
+ 2) + (n − k

) < n i.e. 2k

+ k
′′
> n + 2.
These inequalities imply that k

≥ k ≥ 3, and the lowest dimension where they
are meaningful is the first Whitney case: dim
(Y ) = n = 6 and k

= k
′′
= 3.
Accordingly, W is called Whitney’s disk, although it may be non-homeomorphic
to B
2
with the present definition of W (due to Haefliger).
Lemma
(Haefliger Lemma: Whitney for k
+k

= n). Let the dimensions n−k

=
dim
(X

) and n − k
′′
= dim(X
′′
), where k
′′
≥ k

, of two submanifolds X

and X
′′
in the ambient n-manifold Y satisfy 2k

+ k
′′
> n + 2. Then every homotopy f
t
of (the disjoint union of ) X

and X
′′
in Y which disengages X

from X
′′
, can be
replaced by a disengaging homotopy f
new
t
which is an isotopy, on both manifolds,
i.e. f
new
t
(X

) and f
new
(X
′′
) reman smooth without self intersection points in Y
for all t
∈ [0, 1] and f
new
1
(X

) does not intersect f
new
1
(X
′′
).
Proof.
Assume f
t
is smooth generic and take a small neighbourhood U

⊂ Y
of W . By genericity, this f
t
is an isotopy of X

as well as of X
′′
within U

⊂ Y :
the intersections of f
t
(X

) and f
t
(X
′′
) with U

, call them X


(t) and X
′′

(t) are
smooth submanifolds in U

for all t, which, moreover, do not intersect away from
W
⊂ U

.
Hence, by the Thom isotopy theorem, there exists an isotopy F
t
of Y
∖U
ε
which
equals f
t
on U

∖ U
ε
and which is constant in t on Y
∖ U

.
Since f
t
and F
t
within U

are equal on the overlap U

∖ U
ε
of their definition
domains, they make together a homotopy of X

and X
′′
which, obviously, satisfies
our requirements.
There are several immediate generalizations/applications of this theorem.
(1) One may allow self-intersections Σ
0
within connected components of X,
where the necessary homotopy condition for removing Σ
0
(which was
expressed with the disengaging f
t
in the present case) is formulated in
terms of maps ˜
f
∶ X × X → Y × Y commuting with the involutions
(x
1
, x
2
) ↔ (x
2
, x
1
) in X × X and (y
1
, y
2
) ↔ (y
2
, y
1
) in Y × Y and having
the pullbacks ˜
f
−1
(Y
diag


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-scientific-and.html

the-scientist-and-the.html

the-scriptures-of.html

the-seasonality-and.html

the-second-meeting--.html