1 ... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

The Picture Frame and Other Stories - The Mysterious, Magnificent

bet9/14
Sana18.10.2017
Hajmi1.17 Mb.

The Picture Frame and Other Stories

by Robert Drake,

BA’52, MA’53, Mercer University Press, 175 pp., $23

hardcover

In this collection of autobiographical tales, Robert Drake takes

us once again to the west Tennessee town of Woodville, a place

that bears a striking resemblance to his own birthplace of Ripley.

Drake, an English professor at the University of Tennessee–Knoxville,

recreates a quiet, if quirky community where the women gossip

at bridge games and the men swap opinions of FDR outside the

courthouse.

Here no one bats an eye when an aging county judge is “retired

by his family because they wanted to get him ready for Judgment

Day.” And it is Judgment Day that slowly enters these stories

at the margins as the decades pass and the beloved begin to

succumb to old age. Each funeral brings not only an erosion of

the town’s character but also a deepening sense of urgency for

someone to chronicle the complex lives of these simple folk.

Drake answers this calling and, in the process, discloses his

own bittersweet journey through small-town life at its twilight.

Though The Picture Frame is not his finest collection, it holds

his most intimate portraits.

—Jon Parrish Peede

J O U R N E Y   T O   G R O W N U P

Swimming in Sky

by Inman Majors, BA’86, 241 pp.,

Southern Methodist University Press, $19.95 hardcover

They are legion in America, adult children still living at home,

the 20-somethings whose primary trait seems to be a complete

lack of motivation. In Swimming in Sky, Inman Majors writes

about Jason Say, an unemployed Vanderbilt graduate sleeping

on Mama’s couch in Knoxville.

He’s a young man of intelligence, but not exceptional intelli-

gence, of average appearance, of less-than-admirable morals, and

with no outstanding skills or talents. And he has no job. Jason

doesn’t have much in the way of role models. His football star-

uncle is dead, his mother is divorced, his friends are tending

bar and sharing drugs with him.

So, Jason stands alone at a crossroads, unsure what the American

dream is for a young man with no obvious destiny: “… the

American dream like any other dream, cloudy with dark splotches 

v

v

v

F A L L   2 0 0 1

49

48

V

A

N

D

E

R

B

I

L

T

 

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

UP NORTH

Alumni in 

Boston 

and 

Washington

,

D.C.

, had the opportunity to hear

Chancellor Gordon Gee share his

vision for Vanderbilt in May at the

Boston Harbor Hotel and the Nation-

al Press Club.

New York 

alumni also hosted a

“Conversation with Chancellor Gee”

in April at the Warwick Hotel in mid-

town Manhattan. During May, Big

Apple alums “tripped the light fan-

tastic” during an Argentine Tango

Party at the 92nd Street YMCA.

Pittsburgh 

club members per-

formed a day of community service

in March for the Greater Pittsburgh

Community Food Bank.

The black and gold spirit was alive

in February at the Rush Creek Sports

Bar & Grille where 

Columbus 

alums

gathered for a viewing party as the

Commodores battled the Kentucky

Wildcats.

HEADING WEST

The spirit of the wild, wild West

descended upon 

Dallas 

club mem-

bers in April when they gathered at

the Seventeen Seventeen Restau-

rant in the Dallas Museum of Art to

hear Associate Professor of Fine Arts 

Vivien Fryd lecture on American land-

scape painter Thomas Moran. After

learning how Moran’s depictions of

Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon

influenced Congress to establish

the National Park System in 1916,

alumni toured the Thomas Moran

and the Spirit of Place exhibition.

Colorado 

alumni sported their

black and gold on March 24 as they

cheered the Lady Commodores to

victory in their Sweet 16 game against

Iowa State.

Seattle 

Vanderbilt Club members

recently observed the refined aristo-

crats, business tycoons, and elegant

ladies immortalized by artist John

Singer Sargent in the March exhibi-

tion The Sensualist at the Seattle Art

Museum. Alumni were introduced to

Sargent’s artistic legacy during a lec-

ture by Vivien Fryd, associate pro-

fessor of fine arts.

Kansas City 

alums paid tribute

to Bacchus in March when they held

a wine tasting party at the Classic

Cellar.


Alumni in the City of Angels met

in March at the Staples Center to

watch the 

Los Angeles 

Kings ice the

Colorado Avalanche 4–0.

I M A G E S   O F   V A N D E R B I L T

The Vanderbilt Bookstore is offering a new collection

of 12 images of Vanderbilt, classic scenes ranging from

Benton Chapel and Peabody Commencement to Kirkland

Hall and Commodore football. Shown is an image called

“Quiet Time” taken in the Peabody Education Library.

The prints are available in two sizes, 8" x 10" or 11" x

14". For more information call 615/322-4438 or go to

www.vanderbilt.edu/alumni, scroll down and click on

Vanderbilt Bookstore, then Gifts.

Dore2Dore Open for Business

s

Vanderbilt’s new online community, Dore2Dore,

has enjoyed an overwhelmingly favorable reception

since its launch date of March 7. Thousands of alumni

and current students have registered for the free serv-

ices available to Commodores.

Members can update their alumni records, find a

lost classmate, receive an online newsletter, establish a

permanent e-mail forwarding account, get career ad-

vice, and search a directory of more than 100,000 Van-

derbilt alumni. The most recent statistics from the Office

of Alumni Programs indicate that 4,100 alumni have

updated their online directory entries, 1,365 have signed

up for e-mail forwarding, and 10,795 have registered as

volunteers for the Commodore Career Connection.

If you haven’t signed up, it’s not too late. Becom-

ing a member of the Dore2Dore online community can

be accomplished in five easy steps:

Go to www.vanderbilt.edu/alumni, the link to

Dore2Dore.

Click on “Activation Screen Link for First-Time

Users” to obtain a VUNetID and password.

Click on “Register/Activate your alumni

services account.”

Enter your information exactly as it appears on

the mailing label of the brochure that was mailed to

you and your PIN or VU student ID number.

Return to the Dore2Dore Homepage and begin

using the services.

If you experience any problems, refer to the Fre-

quently Asked Questions page or e-mail our Help Desk

by following the links provided.

CLUBS IN ACTION

IN VANDY’S BACKYARD

Nashville 

Vanderbilt Club members

dined at a southern buffet and heard

colorful anecdotes from the history

of Nashville’s businesses during a

March panel discussion held in con-

junction with the publication of For-

tunes, Fiddles & Fried Chicken by Bill

Carey, BA’87. 

Players from the legendary

1989–1990 Commodore basketball

team returned to campus in Febru-

ary for a reunion in the Stadium Club

with more than 350 Nashville alum-

ni and friends.

DOWN SOUTH

Palm Beach/Broward County 

alums

enjoyed a palatable breakfast before

viewing paintings from the palettes

of 30 artists represented in The Tri-

umphs of French Painting: Master- pieces from Ingres to Matisse exhib-

ited in March at the Norton Museum

of Art. Associate Professor of Fine

Arts Robert Mode lectured on the 55

paintings from one of the most dynam-

ic periods in Western art.

Following a March luncheon at

La Madeleine and a lecture on World

War II by Associate Professor of His-

tory Sam McSeveney, 

New Orleans

alumni toured exhibits displayed at

the D-Day Museum.

Baton Rouge 

alums enjoyed con-

versation and libations during a March

happy hour at the Fox & Hound Pub

& Grille.

Huntsville 

Vanderbilt Club mem-

bers went “LIVE! at the Huntsville-

Madison County Library” in April to

hear Inman Majors, BA’86, discuss

his new book, Swimming in Sky.

They know him as the crooner of

such musical hits as “Crocodile Rock”

and “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road,”

but 

Atlanta 

alumni gained another

perspective on Sir Elton John during

an outing in January to the High Muse-

um. After viewing the exhibition Cho-

rus of Light, club members learned

the British singer also owns one of

the world’s most extraordinary pri-

vate collections of photographs. 

Professor Leonard Folgarait, chair of

the fine arts department, lectured on

selections from the 320 masterpieces

comprising the singer’s collection.

Reunion and Homecoming Unite in Fall 2002

s

What do you get when you combine two black and

gold celebrations into one action-packed weekend?

A Vanderbilt extravaganza—replete with a parade,

tailgate party, football game, lectures, class parties,

and campus tours.

Next fall, Reunion and Homecoming will be

celebrated on the same weekend. After careful delib-

erations, the Alumni Association Board of Directors

and the University’s administration have decided to

move Reunion weekend from the customary spring

date to fall.

A combination of these events on October 25–26,

2002, will offer many opportunities for alumni to re-

turn to a vibrant campus and see their classmates as

well as students from all schools within the University.

The Office of Alumni Programs promises plenty of

class-specific activities for Reunion participants in

addition to campus-wide Homecoming festivities.

Campus was abuzz with 2,350 alumni and

friends who returned to Vanderbilt June 1–2

for Reunion 2001. Reuniting alumni included

10 undergraduate classes ending in ‘1’ and

‘6’ plus Quinqs, alumni who graduated 50

years ago or more. Fred and Claudia Lummis,

general chairs of Reunion 2001 and both

BA’76, presented a check to Chancellor

Gordon Gee for $14,165,774. The check

represented gifts and five-year

pledges made by 2,275 alumni

and exceeded the reunion fund-

raising goal by more than $1

million. More than 1,600 Quinqs

contributed an additional $12.7

million in gifts, pledges, and

bequests. Top: Wayne S. Hyatt

(left), BA’65, JD’68, hands the

presidential reins of the Alumni

Association Board of Directors

to Stephen S. Riven, BA’60, during

the Saturday luncheon. Riven

is a principal in Avondale Partners,

a Nashville investment banking

firm. Top right: Jennifer McClennon, BS’96,

and Janice Feagin Olson Britton, BSN’44,

put their heads together during the Meet-

the-Faculty cocktail hour. Right: Sandy M.

Moore, A’51, enjoys a dance with his wife,

Sue Ann Kaeser Moore, A’52.  

To see more Reunion 2001 photos, visit

www.vanderbilt.edu/alumni

A L U M N I   G A T H E R   F O R   R E U N I O N   2 0 0 1

A

LUMNI


N

EWS 


Oops, We Goofed “The report of my death was an exaggeration.”

—Mark Twain

Due to a data collection error, the following alumni were errone-

ously listed in the 2001 Vanderbilt Alumni Directory as deceased.

Vanderbilt deeply regrets the error.

James F. Arthur, BA’67

James C. Bethshares Jr., BA’56

Margaret Reynolds Dudley, BA’60

Webb C. Rizor Jr., E’52

William Ledford Stone, BA’66, MD’69

Charles M. Woodruff Jr., BA’66, MS’68

A L U M N I   A S S O C I A T I O N   S E E K S

N O M I N A T I O N S   F O R

D I S T I N G U I S H E D   A L U M N U S   A W A R D

The Alumni Association of Vanderbilt University presents

the Distinguished Alumnus Award to an alumnus or alum-

na whose extraordinary achievements have had a posi-

tive and significant impact on society. If you would like to

place a name in nomination, please use this form or other

written document with the information and mail to: 

Stephen

S. Riven, President, Alumni Association, Vanderbilt

University, 117 Alumni Hall, Nashville, TN 37240. 

Nom-

inations are due by December 1, 2001.

LYNN CRADICK

Arizona: 

Frederick Eugene Powell III,

BA’80, 602/582-0483

Atlanta: 

Bruce Elder, BA’92, MBA’93,

404/329-2029

Austin: 

Catherine Fendrich, BS’94,

512/502-8311

Baltimore: 

Election pending

Baton Rouge: 

Natalie Martin,

BE’98, 504/767-8654

Birmingham: 

Clarke Houston Gillespy,

BA’94, 205/871-7599

Boston: 

Thayer Swartwood,

BA’96, 617/859-9604

Bowling Green: 

Election pending

Central Florida: 

Harvey Baxter,

BA’67, 352/378-8621

Charlotte: 

David Smith, BA’89,

704/334-3127

Chattanooga: 

Joy Ammer Irwin,

BE’89, 706/820-7718

Chicago: 

Melanie Oh, BS’97, 773/327-9155

Cincinnati: 

Sarah Raup Johnson,

BA’77, 513/871-2575

Clarksville/Hopkinsville: 

Robert Preston 

Kennedy, BA’92, MBA’93,

931/645-8476

Cleveland: 

Ann Hamilton Womer-

Benjamin, BA’75, 330/562-4861

Colorado: 

Leila Hahn, BA’95,

303/222-5405

Columbus: 

Rodd S. Lawrence,

BA’84, JD’87, 614/221-7633

Dallas: 

James Kerins, BE’95, 214/521-6828

Detroit: 

Carrie Renee Van Ess, BS’95,

248/340-2035

Four Corners (Tenn.-Ark.-Ky.-Mo.): 

Roy 

B. Herron, MDiv’80, JD’80, Dresden,

Tenn., 901/364-5782

Hong Kong: 

Michael Todd Miller,

BA’88, 852-2913-3783

Houston: 

Douglas Atnipp, BA’82, and 

Veronica Obermayer Atnipp, BA’82,

713/827-1962

Huntsville: 

Election pending

Indianapolis: 

Eric Michael Douthit,

BS’94, 317/824-0197

Jackson, Miss.: 

John Ditto III,

BA’94, 601/982-4574

Jackson, Tenn.: 

John Garrard,

MBA’90, 901/424-6343

Jacksonville: 

Christopher Martin Thomp- 

pson, BS’87, and Stephanie Bures  

Thompson, BE’87, 904/287-4044

Kansas City: 

Diana Bliss Kreiling,

BA’90, 816/636-6117

Knoxville: 

Election pending

Lexington: 

William L. Montague Jr.,

BA’88, 859/269-8331

Little Rock: 

John Earl Tull III,

BA’80, 501/221-3315

Los Angeles: 

Beth Cormier Pearson,

BA’84, 949/474-4403

Louisville: 

David Jason Hale,

BA’89, 502/292-0335

Maury County (Tenn.): 

Manuel DeWayne 

Young, BE’85, 931/388-9755

Memphis: 

Joel Benjamin Sklar,

JD’92, 901/543-8016

Miami: 

Victoria Arsenis, BS’98,

305/695-0013

Mid-Florida: 

Thomas Kimbrough 

Johnson, JD’97, and Gina DeLuca 

Johnson, MSN’97, 407/894-9342

Minneapolis: 

Joshua Lee Kammerer,

BA’96, 651/290-2015

Mobile: 

Evan Austill Jr., BS’93,

334/476-2507

Montgomery: 

Robert S. Hill III,

BA’65, 334/834-7471

Murfreesboro: 

Election pending

Muscle Shoals, Ala.: 

Election pending

Nashville: 

James Littlejohn,

BE’76, 615/371-0008

New Jersey: 

David M. Kupfer, BA’78,

JD’81, Chester, N.J., 908/879-4662

New Orleans: 

M. Lisette Carter,

BA’87, 504/818-0262

New York: 

Meghan Cobleigh Medlock,

BA’97, 212/535-0317

Northern California (San Francisco):

Matthew R. Nemer, BA’96,

415/292-5213

North Carolina Triangle/Cary, N.C.:

Ryan Putman, BE’97, 919/380-8715

Oklahoma City: 

Stephen Bond Payne,

BA’92, and Lori Renee Duphorne 

Payne, BS’92, 405/524-0906

Palm Beach/Broward County:

Brad Helicher, BA’99, 954/489-2395

Pensacola: 

Robert W. Moulton,

BA’62, 850/432-5617

Philadelphia: 

Stroud Hellebusch,

BS’87, 215/855-4470

Pittsburgh: 

Susan Wagner, BA’78

Richmond: 

Heather Hewitt Daniel, BA’82,

804/353-5873

Rome (Ga.): 

Robert M. Hammond Jr.,

BA’71, 706/291-4259

St. Louis: 

William F. James Jr.,

BA’73, 314/995-5341 

San Antonio: 

Kenneth W. Thomas Jr.,

BE’70, and Susan Upshaw Thomas,

BA’70, 210/828-8771

San Diego: 

Election pending

Seattle: 

William Sadler, BE’94, and Allison 

Valuch Sadler, BE’97, 425/898-9496

Shelbyville/Highland Rim: 

Joan Todd 

Gray, BS’65, 931/684-2833, and John 

Pitts, BA’76, 931/684-2561

Shreveport: 

Election pending

South Carolina-Piedmont: 

H. Mills 

Gallivan, BA’73, Greenville, S.C.,

864/271-5341

Tampa/St. Petersburg: 

Ryan Barack,

BS’95, 813/251-6689

Tri-Cities/Johnson City, Tenn.: 

John 

Adams Butler, MBA’96, 423/915-0240

Tri-States: 

E. Phillips Malone,

BE’63, Owensboro, Ky., 270/685-2041

Tulsa: 

G. Lawrence Fox, BA’80,

918/743-9397

Tupelo: 

Daniel Brasfield, BA’64, and 

Frances Joyner Brasfield, BA’64,

601/844-3490

Washington, D.C.: 

Eric S. Purple,

BA’90, 703/524-3899

West Alabama: 

Alyce M. Spruell, BA’80,

Tuscaloosa, Ala., 205/752-3330

Western Kentucky: 

Election pending

Western Michigan: 

George L. Whitfield,

BA’60, LLB’63, Grand Rapids, Mich.,

616/752-2000

N

ews for this section should be

sent to Nelson Bryan, class

notes editor, Vanderbilt

Magazine, VU Station B 357703, 2301

Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN, 37235-

7703, fax: 615/343-8547, or e-mail: vanderbiltmagazine@vanderbilt.edu.

Please include your degree, year, and,

when applicable, maiden name. You

also can send us news or update your

address and other biographical

information electronically through

forms on the alumni home page at www.vanderbilt.edu/alumni.

REUNION OCTOBER 25–26, 2002

QUINQ

Rolla A. Nausley,

DDS’22, lives in

Murfreesboro, Tenn.,

at the age of 103 years.

Laurence Grossman, BA’38, MD’41,

was honored by Nashville’s St. Thomas

Hospital with the creation of the Lau-

rence and Dorothy Grossman Chair of

Excellence in Cardiac Research, the

first of about 10 endowed chairs at the

St. Thomas Clinical Research Institute.

William B. Hunter, MA’39, PhD’46,

continues his retirement in Greens-

boro, N.C., and publishes papers on

John Milton and Shakespeare. In the

spring, the South Central Renaissance

Society established an annual lecture-

ship in his name. Al Whitman, BA’39,

JD’69, of Sylacauga, Ala., published a

World War II novel, As You Were,

under the pen name Whit Whitman.

Blair E. Batson, BA’41, MD’44, was

honored with the 2000 Humanitarian

of the Year Tribute by the Epilepsy

Foundation in Jackson, Miss. Robert

O. Bickley, E’42, writes that he and his

wife moved to Smyrna, Tenn., in

November 1999 to be near their

daughter, son-in-law, and grand-

daughter. “We find it an enjoyable

community.” Ullin Leavell, A’43,

received the Honorary Alumnus Award

from the University of Kentucky. A

graduate of Duke Medical School, he

established the dermatology section at

UK in 1961 and served as associate

professor of pathology and professor

and chairman of Department of Medi-

cine Division of Dermatology. Janice

Feagin Britton, BSN’44, returned to

Spanish Fort, Ala., in the summer of

2000 after serving with the U.S. Peace

Corps in Zambia. “This was a mar-

velous opportunity to live with ordi-

nary people in a culture quite different

s

Country music star Marty Stuart was eight years old

when he first encountered the artistic talent of Tom

Allen, A’50. Stuart bought a copy of Flatt and Scruggs’

Greatest Hits at a five-and-dime store in Philadelphia,

Miss., and was captivated as much by Allen’s cover illus-

tration as by the bluegrass duo’s music.

“It was the first time I’d ever seen anything other

than a photograph on a record sleeve,” Stuart writes on

Allen’s Web site (http://thomasballen.com/about.html).

“I thought it was brilliant. It gave the musicians a kind

of immortality. It truly was an eye opener for me to see

Lester and Earl in color; we didn’t own a color TV.”

Allen went on to do illustrations for seventeen

Flatt and Scruggs records as well as numerous others in

country, gospel, and jazz. He also was a noted freelance

illustrator for Esquire, Sports Illustrated, Life, Look, McCall’s, Colliers, the New Yorker, plus CBS-TV and

Columbia Records.

His work took him from the jungles of Nicaragua to

the Nevada desert. In the latter locale, Allen spent three

weeks in 1960 on the movie set of “The Misfits,” doing Esquire illustrations of stars Marilyn Monroe and Clark

Gable.


Directed by the legendary John Huston, “The Mis-

fits” proved to be the final movie ever made by Monroe

and Gable. Gable died of a heart attack two weeks after

completing the film; Monroe died of a drug overdose

nearly two years later. Also on the set was the movie’s

screenwriter, Arthur Miller, noted playwright and hus-

band of Monroe.

Allen met the stars at a small cocktail party the evening

he arrived. But he will never forget Marilyn’s appear-

ance on the set the next morning.

“Marilyn Monroe emerged from her dressing room

trailer—white hair, white skin, red lips, white dress spot-

ted with red strawberries, white shoes, and beneath a

white parasol that protected her from the white hot

desert sun that reflected off the white Nevada salt

flats. She glowed.”

Allen was commissioned by Life to do a series of

paintings of Harry Truman to be used in the event of

the former president’s death. Allen went out to the Tru-

man Library in Independence, Mo., to look at a multi-

tude of pictures and material.

“I did the paintings but the only problem was that

Harry outlived Life,” says Allen. “Truman was still liv-

ing when the magazine folded. So the very last issue of

Life had three of my paintings of President Truman in

a spread.” Allen donated the paintings to the Truman

Library, where they still are on display.

Allen, 73, a native Nashvillian who attended Van-

derbilt’s College of Arts and Science, has combined

his art with academia since 1958, when he was hired

to teach at the School of Visual Arts in New York. He

also has taught at Syracuse University, where he was

chairman of the Department of Visual Communica-

tions; Kansas University, where he served as the Hall-

mark Distinguished Professor for 12 years; and the

Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Fla. He

recently stepped down as head of Ringling’s illustration

department, but continues to teach there.

His first teaching assignment, however, came at Van-

derbilt, where he was a scholarship football player. Mar-

ion Junkin, the only art professor at Vanderbilt at the

time, became ill and selected Allen to teach the final six

weeks of his studio art class, a rare compliment for a

sophomore. After leaving Vanderbilt, Allen earned a

degree in fine art from the Art Institute of Chicago and

then spent two years as an officer in the Marine Corps.

Last year Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium hosted a

retrospective of Allen’s work. An opening concert fea-

turing Marty Stuart and Earl Scruggs raised $9,000

for the Thomas B. Allen Scholarship at the Watkins Insti-

tute, where Allen began taking art classes at age 10.

The Ryman exhibition is being reorganized for touring

with the first show scheduled for Washington Univer-

sity in St. Louis in August and September.

Both Vanderbilt and the Cheekwood Museum of Art

have held exhibitions of Allen’s work and number his

paintings among their collections.

“His work is as timeless as the music itself,” Stuart

says.“He is a master who can bring art to life in its most

complex form, yet his genius is knowing how to pres-

ent it in a way that even an eight-year-old child in a dime

store can understand.”

—Lew Harris

To see more of Allen’s work, turn to the inside front

cover.

Tom Allen  

A N   A M E R I C A N   I L L U S T R A T O R

ED CLARK


Tom Allen, A’50, with a fan, country music star Marty Stuart

C

LASS 

N

OTES



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-purpose-of-naming--.html

the-purpose-of-the.html

the-quaker-heights.html

the-quaternary-4.html

the-queen-of-the-united-2.html