1 2 3

The Perso-Islamic Garden: a reclassification of Iranian Garden Design after the Arab Invasion

bet1/3
Sana23.06.2017
Hajmi315.59 Kb.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Perso-Islamic Garden: A Reclassification of Iranian Garden Design after the Arab Invasion 

 

 

 

Lyla Halsted 

 

   

 

 

 

Senior Thesis Completed 

In Fulfillment of 

The Honors Program in Art History 

Davidson College 

April 11, 2014 

Halsted 1 

 

 

Table of Contents 

I)

 

Introduction……………………………………………………………………………2 

II)


 

Section One……………………………………...…………………………………….7 

III)

  Section Two………………………………………………………………………….18 

IV)

 

Section Three……………………………………………………………………...…24 

V)

 

Conclusion………………………………………………………………………...…36 

VI)

 

Post Script…………………………………………………………………………....37 

VII)

 

Images………………………………………………………………………………..49 

VIII)

 

Bibliography…………………………………………………………...…………….64 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Halsted 2 

 

Introduction 

Art history is, in part, a discipline of classification. Scholars are only able to comprehend 

the nebulous, never ending undulations of style and influence by breaking the continuous flow of 

time and talent into periods, movements, or other classifications. Some are more specific than 

others, but often these names (Baroque, Surrealism, Post-Modernism) cause scholars difficulty 

due to their overuse or their vague nature. One such classification, Islamic, is particularly 

problematic when one considers all that it is used to describe. Any work, from the mid-seventh 

century to the present day and located in any one of dozens of countries can have this 

classification. The widespread use of the “Islamic” classification in regards to art becomes 

particularly problematic when certain countries have their own traditions which, despite the 

legitimate influence of Islam, have a strong cultural presence. Iran’s thousands of years of 

cultural history prior to the introduction of Islam, for example, have in some ways been eclipsed 

by emphasis on the Islamic ideology brought by the Arabs into the region. 

It is unusual, if not impossible, to encounter more than a handful of books or articles 

about Iranian art in Western scholarship. There are, however, hundreds of publications dealing 

with Islamic art, which list the arts of Iran as a subcategory. These works begin with descriptions 

of Islam, its history and symbolism, and then take a tour of the art of Muslim countries, including 

Iran. It is uncommon, today, then, to hear about “Iranian art” as a field; most exhibitions title 

works from Iran as “Islamic”, displaying them with the works of other Middle Eastern countries, 

and effectively identifying the works as “Islamic” first before specifying their Iranian origin.

1

 In 

literature this phenomenon is repeated, for example, in survey books that place Iranian works 

1

 Any museum or gallery can be used as an example here, but perhaps the most obvious use of this generalization 

is at the Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C. 

                                                           



Halsted 3 

 

into the “Islamic Art” section, even when the works themselves are not directly influenced by 

Islam.

2

 “

Islamic” seems to have become an overarching, generalized description of the arts of 

the Middle East, and it will be argued here that it is insufficient and moreover misleading in 

many cases, particularly in that of the Iranian garden. 

Similar to the aforementioned arts of Iran, gardens in Iran are commonly classified as 

“Islamic” gardens.

3

 The classification stems from the view that they reflect the tenets of Islam in 

their design and are imbued with Islamic symbolism. In books detailing the gardens of Islam, 

such as Fairchild Ruggles’ Islamic Gardens and Landscapes (2008), gardens in Grenada, Agra, 

and Isfahan are all listed as equally “Islamic” in origin and execution.

4

 While these cities were 

all once under the rule of Islamic civilizations and their gardens were built by Muslims, it is my 

contention that it is remiss to group them together in this way under the banner of Islam. Of the 

three cities mentioned, as this paper will discuss, only Grenada’s gardens appear largely 

Islamic.


5

 In Emma Clark’s The Art of the Islamic Garden (2011), Clark groups Iranian gardens 

together with gardens in Morocco, Syria, India and Spain without addressing regional or cultural 

differences.

6

 Though Penelope Hobhouse devotes an entire book to distinctly Persian gardens, in 

her earlier work The Story of Gardening (2001), she introduces the gardens of the Alhambra 

2

 Fred Kleiner, Gardner’s Art through the Ages (Wadsworth, BA: Cengage Learning, 2008), 153. 

3

 Emma Clark, The Art of the Islamic Garden (Wiltshire, England: The Crowood Press Ltd., 2011). ; D. Fairchild 

Ruggles, Islamic Gardens and Landscapes (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008). ; Luigi 

Zangheri, Il Giardino Islamico, translation from Italian to Farsi by Majid Rasekhi and Farhad Tehrani (Tehran, Iran: 

Cultural Research Bureau, 2006). 

4

 Ruggles, 28-30. 

5

 Even then, as this paper will posit, there remain elements that don’t appear to be derived from Islam. 

6

 Clark, 11. 

                                                           

Halsted 4 

 

alongside those of Isfahan.

7

 It will be the aim of this paper to present such comparisons as 

problematic.

8

 

The generalized use of the term “Islamic” is not unique to Western scholarship. Though 

less common, books classifying Iranian gardens as Islamic can also be found in Iran. Azadeh 

Shahcheranghi focuses on the Islamic symbolism of gardens in the Middle East and especially 

Iran.


9

 However, for every one of these works, there are several that introduce Iranian gardens as 

their own field. For example, this can be evidenced in Gholam Reza Naima’s Iranian Gardens 

(2011), Mehdi Khansari, Mohammad Moghtader and Menush Yavari’s Iranian Gardens: A 

reflection of Paradise (2004), and Faryar Javahiran’s Iranian Gardens: Ancient Philosophy, New  Perspectives (2004).

10

 These works focus on the gardens of Iran not as simply a product of 

Islamic ideology, but rather as an ancient tradition continuing to the present day.

11

 In contrast to 

Western scholarship, they put relatively little emphasis on the Islamic influence present in the 

gardens, effectively opposing the Western view.

12

 One can perhaps account for this difference in 

scholarship by arguing that Iranians are naturally more likely to treat their country’s gardens as 

an independent subject due to national bias and more readily available resources on the subject. 

However, one might also say that the treatment of Iranian gardens as an independent subject, free 

7

 Penelope Hobhouse, The Story of Gardening (New York, NY: Dorling Kindersley Publishers Ltd., 2001), 57. 

8

 Though Hobhouse does, in her subsequent book The Gardens of Persia, examine Iranian gardens much more 

closely, even referencing ancient Iran as a potential influence for Iranian gardens in the Medieval Islamic period. 

9

 Azadeh Shahcheraghi, Paradigms of Paradise, 3

rd

 edition (Tehran, Iran: Jahad Daneshgahi, 2012) 1-10. 

10

 Gholam Reza Naima, Iranian Gardens (Tehran, Iran: Payam Publishing, 2011), 168-9. Medi Khansari, Mohammad 

Reza Moghtader, Menush Yavari, Iranian Gardens: A Reflection of Paradise (Tehran, Iran: Hemayesh Int’l, 2004). 

Faryar Javahiran, Iranian Gardens: Ancient Philosophy, New Perspectives (Tehran, Iran: The Museum of 

Contemporary Iranian Art, 2004), 16. 

11

 These works provide the first steps toward tracing the ancient origins of the Iranian garden by mentioning pre-

Islamic gardens and offering potential cultural, rather than Islamic, interpretations for later gardens. This paper 

differs by providing, with specific examples, several components that are not only inconsistent with Islamic 

thought, but also clearly linked to pre-Islamic practices. Certain motifs are explored and revisited over the course 

of millennia of history, supporting the argument for the strength of their pre-Islamic character. 

12

 There are, of course, exceptions to this. Penelope Hobhouse’s The Gardens of Persia adopts a view which in 

many ways reflects that of Iranian scholars, though it does not reach the same level of detailed analysis. 

                                                           



Halsted 5 

 

of the overarching label of “Islamic” gardens, indicates that Iranians acknowledge distinctions 

between gardens in Iran and the rest of the Islamic world.  

Part of the difference between Iranian and Islamic gardens might be related to the 

theology that predates Islam in the region. Most Western scholars discussing the Iranian 

gardening tradition do not mention Zoroastrianism, the faith tradition that was prevalent in Iran 

for millennia before the Arab Invasion introduced Islam. Eastern scholars occasionally point to 

Zoroastrian elements in gardens, though do not make any claims about its wider role in the 

Iranian gardening tradition. This paper will use Zoroastrianism’s presence in ancient Iran right 

up until the coming of Islam to present certain iconographical motifs which are found even after 

the fall of the Zoroastrian empires. 

If one examines both western and eastern scholarship on this matter, while also visiting 

the gardens of Iran, and considering the ancient faith tradition of the region, the widely argued 

position that Iranian gardens are simply emblematic of Islamic gardens comes into question. 

While scholars such as Ruggles, Clark, and Porter explain the Iranian garden as a manifestation 

of Islamic ideology, I intend to argue the opposite. It is my contention that the gardens in Iran 

possess certain features that, while commonly attributed to Islamic origins, actually originated 

long before the Arab invasion and the introduction of Islam to the area. Therefore, I will argue 

that many garden characteristics that are widely believed to reflect Islamic symbolism actually 

predate Islam and the Islamic significance they are considered to be imbued with was assigned to 

them later. I will contend that Muslims, finding the gardens in Iran to reflect in many ways their 

conception of Paradise, assimilated the past traditions into their own gardens but assigned it new 

significance. Though this Islamic significance was not present when the gardens in Iran 

originated, it is now a part of the gardens’ identity, and therefore should not be dismissed. It is 



Halsted 6 

 

for these reasons that I wish to introduce the term “Perso-Islamic” to describe the gardens in 

Iran, in acknowledgement of their ancient Persian origins as well as their, albeit later, Islamic 

symbolism. The idea of a Perso-Islamic hybrid represents a break from previous scholarship, 

which, for the most part, either labels the gardens as Islamic or Persian without accounting for 

the duality of their nature.

13

 The purpose of this paper, then, is to suggest the ways in which the 

Islamic garden in Iran appropriated the forms of ancient gardens without preserving their original 

pre-Islamic content. The tradition of hybridity continues to the present day, and its perpetual 

existence will be used as further evidence for the strength of its ancient origins. The following 

discussion is divided into three sections. The first will begin by introducing the pre-Islamic 

Iranian gardening tradition in order to establish a clear picture of the elements of Iranian gardens 

that can be considered purely Iranian. I will then, in the second section, examine the Arab 

Invasion and the reaction of the Muslim Arabs to the Iranian gardening tradition, appropriating 

certain forms but assigning them new theological meaning. Finally, in the third section, I will 

examine gardens in Iran from the Safavid period to the present day and suggest how I believe 

those gardens should be described as “Perso-Islamic”. 

 

   

 

13

 It is important to note here, that the purpose of this paper is not to completely reject Islamic influence in the 

Iranian gardening tradition. Rather, it is to acknowledge a dual nature, though emphasis has been placed on the 

Iranian or Persian elements as, up until this point, they have been largely overlooked. Since most scholarship 

already acknowledges the Islamic elements of the gardens, the Persian elements are emphasized here to establish 

the concept of hybridity. 

                                                           

Halsted 7 

 

Section One 

Iran’s history is a long and turbulent one. The region has endured numerous invasions, 

wars and revolutions. Yet its starting point, the beginning of Iranian civilization, was a time of 

prosperity, thriving trade, and stable dynastic rule. The “Perso” prefix of “Perso-Islamic” 

originates here, and an understanding of the ancient empires of Iran is the foundation upon which 

the remainder of this paper is built. Exploring this period’s gardens necessitates analyzing its 

governance, religion, and values to arrive at a true understanding of the meaning behind the ruins 

it left behind. 

While most Western civilizations have histories that can only be traced back one or two 

thousand years, the region known today as “Iran” has several thousand years of traceable history. 

From the Elamites (2700 BCE) to the Sassanians (651 CE), Iran was home to several flourishing 

pre-Islamic civilizations. In the tenth century BCE, Persia was a part of the Mede empire, until 

one of its kings married a Median princess who gave birth to Cyrus II (the Great), one of the 

most famous Iranians in history. He eventually joined the two kingdoms of the Persians and the 

Medes and founded the Achaemenid Empire, becoming “great king, king of kings, king of the 

lands”.

14  The reference does not mean he was king of other kings, but rather emphasizes the 

strength of his lineage from previous kings like the legendary Achaemenes.

15

 The Achaemenids, 

or Persians, emerged in Fars (in south eastern Iran) under the rule of Cyrus in 700 BCE and 

allied with the neighboring civilization, the Elamites, in 670 BCE. During his reign, Cyrus 

conquered several kingdoms, including those of the Lydians and Babylonians, expanding the 

14

 The title of “shahanshah” or “king of kings” applied to the earliest Achaemenid kings, but also to any Persian 

King from that point up to the last king of Iran, Reza Pahlavi. The importance of lineage in Persian society evolved 

from a fixation with history, and a desire to connect with past eras. 

15

Elton Daniel, The History of Iran (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2001), 36-38. The emphasis on royal genealogy 

is pivotal in the Iranian concept of monarchy. 

                                                           



Halsted 8 

 

empire significantly. He allowed his new subjects to worship their own gods (though 

Zoroastrianism was the official religion of the empire), and ruled them according to their 

customs.


16

 Cyrus was the first truly “great” Iranian ruler; his policies won him the favor of his 

subjects, and set the precedent for the long procession of powerful monarchs in Iran. Cyrus’ 

empire, that of the Achaemenids (or Persians), is considered the apogee of ancient Iran, and it is 

from this era that the word “Persian” derives. 

Cyrus is a widely known historical figure, yet few realize that he made an impact on 

more than just the realm of politics and trade. He is credited, based on the limited information we 

have today, with building the first major imperial garden in Iran. This garden was located in the 

southern region of the Iranian plateau, an area known today as Fars. It was first described 

twenty-five hundred years ago by visitors to the region, such as the historian, Xenophon and the 

Spartan admiral, Lysander, and the

 

remains of its foundations and hardscapes can still be seen 

today.


17

 Under the Achaemenid Emperor Cyrus, this garden was built on the site of the royal 

palaces at Pasargadae.

18

 Today, the garden is little more than a dry patch of earth, but the 

sophisticated irrigation system that made its existence possible in the harsh heat of the desert is 

still largely intact (Fig. 1). It is from these pieces of rock, arranged in straight canals around the 

perimeter of the rectangular plot of land and through the center of the long rectangle that one 

finds the first solid evidence of the Iranian garden’s origins.

19

  Pasargadae was a large palace complex, and Cyrus’ private palace rose up from the flat 

plain of the desert with balconies from which the ruler could survey the rest of the complex, and 

16

 Gene Garthwaite, The Persians (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2007), 60. 

17

 Yves Porter, Palaces and Gardens of Persia (Paris, France: Flammarion, 2003), 79. 

18

 Gholam Reza Naima, Iranian Gardens (Tehran, Iran: Payam Publishing, 2011), 5. 

19

Penelope Hobhouse, Gardens of Persia (New York, NY: Kales Press, 2004), 7. 

                                                           

Halsted 9 

 

most importantly for this discussion, his garden. The second story terrace of his palace allowed 

Cyrus an aerial view of his entire garden. At first, the terrace appears to be an insignificant detail 

and perhaps a logical design decision. However, in the larger context of the gardening tradition 

in Iran, the terrace marks the early development of an important architectural practice which I 

will argue carries a great deal of symbolism. Before examining the possible significance of the 

aerial view, however, it is important to note other instances during this period when the aerial 

perspective was replicated. 

Cyrus’s legacy was continued in 522 BCE by Darius, an equally revered ruler, who 

spread his reign from Egypt to India, conquering a large portion of the known world at the time. 

Darius is significant to this discussion because he built ancient Iran’s most famous and loftiest 

monument, in many ways taking Cyrus’ aerial view, replicating it, and magnifying it.

20

 Darius 


built a great terrace and a series of monumental palaces to celebrate and illustrate his military 

successes and acquisitions. He built this testament to his own splendor at Persepolis, a site 

chosen by Cyrus which was only a hundred kilometers from Pasargadae. This site, today known 

by Iranians as Takht-I Jamshid, is one of Iran’s oldest remaining monuments. It stands in ruins, 

but one may still ascend the stairs of the raised terrace and view twenty-foot columns, reliefs

,

 

and crumbling gateways (Fig. 2). The most striking aspect of the complex is its lofty terrace. 

The entire complex rises high above the surrounding area, well over twenty feet in the 

air, potentially symbolizing Darius and his successors’ might and omnipotence. The palaces were 

easily defended from such heights, and all those who approached were made to ascend a double-

20

Darius’s son, Xerxes describes his father’s military successes on a tablet found in one of his palaces, “These are 

the Countries of which I was king outside Persia…:  Media, Elam, Aracchosia, Armenia, Drangiana, Parthia, Aria, 

Bactria, Sogdiana, Chorasmia, Babylonia, Assyria ….Libyans, Carians, and Nubians.” Stone tablet, 5

th 

century BCE, 

Iranian Museum of Antiquities, Tehran, Iran. 

                                                           



Halsted 10 

 

tiered stairway with shallow stairs, forcing a leisurely and regal pace. Approaching Persepolis 

today, the awe and trepidation felt by the subjects of the Achaemenid kings’ rule can still be felt. 

The raised terrace is topped by only a few ruined columns and lintels, but what remains is 

enough to suggest the heights to which the grand palaces once rose atop their lofty perch. 

Though the complex itself is not a garden, it contained several. The winter palace at Persepolis, 

Tachara, included a central garden which Darius viewed from a raised platform much like Cyrus 

in his own garden.

21

   Both Cyrus and Darius chose to view their gardens (and their realms) from great heights. 

The viewing of a garden from above might be regarded as a simple desire to see it in its entirety, 

but if one considers the religious and cultural atmosphere of the time, the elevated position from 

which gardens were viewed becomes more complex and significant.  

Even more importantly, however, the physical hierarchy differentiating ruler from subject 

might, it could be argued, mirror a contemporaneous religious tradition. The Achaemenids were 

officially Zoroastrians, a faith centered on a primary deity, Ahura Mazda, who ruled over a 

pantheon of immortals. Zoroastrianism predates even the ancient Achaemenid Empire by at least 

a thousand years, and the common ancient belief was that the king of the Achaemenids served as 

Ahura Mazda’s “representative on earth” and was held to great regard in a religious context, 

mirroring similar divine rights of kingship in the West.

22

 In fact, the coronation of Achaemenid 

kings was considered symbolic of sunrise, linking the king to the divine life giving force of the 

21

Despite the fact that it too is not a garden, Darius’s mausoleum represents the continuation of the same concept. 

It, along with subsequent imperial tombs, is set into a cliff face, with the door so high up a smooth wall that it is 

inaccessible except with modern scaffolding (Fig. 3). Even in death, the great Acaemenid emperor wished to look 

down on his people from above.  Hobhouse, 52.  

22

 Mary Boyce, Zoroastrians (London, UK: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1979), 58. 

                                                           

Halsted 11 

 

sun.

23

 The ascension of the king to power, through coronation, was likened to the sun rising in 

the sky. As a representative or symbol of the divine, the Achaemenid ruler reflected not only 

terrestrial might, but otherworldly power, which was perhaps best expressed by elevating him to 

the heavens literally with raised platforms and palaces. The raised position reflects the pre-

Achaemenid compulsion of humanity to consider mountains and pyramids as homes of the 

gods.

24  It also reflects how the raised position became the rightful place of the divinely ordained 

rulers. 

But why, then, did Ahura Mazda’s representative on earth, Cyrus, and later Darius 

choose to build a garden in their palace complexes? It is generally agreed that humanity has 

always been drawn out of deserts and wastelands into lush fields and oases, as water and fertile 

soil are the very basis of human survival. The creation of gardens can be speculated to have been 

a result of the desire for an oasis in the harsh, arid Iranian plateau. On the most basic level, Cyrus 

undoubtedly built his garden because he wished for a green, lush space to beautify the sandy, dry 

palace complex he commissioned. But beyond this basic appreciation for water, shade and fertile 

soil I believe there is also a theological explanation for the great lengths Cyrus went to in order 

to build his gardens.  

From the very earliest periods of human civilization, gardens have been compared to 

paradise, and parallels between the garden and a celestial paradise are common in many 

23

 Jacques Duchensne-Guillemin, Symbols and Values in Zoroastrianism (New York, NY: Harper and Row, 1966), 

118. 

24

 The desire to survey one’s domain and sit high above the land in a position of exaltation is not unique to Cyrus’ 

garden or Darius’ palace complex. Since the dawn of civilization, individuals have tried to reach the heavens, 

whether by building pyramids, ziggurats or towers. Mountains and volcanoes have for millennia been considered 

homes of the gods. On stamps dating to the third millennia BCE from Susa, one can clearly see depictions of 

mountains with cypress trees growing from their peaks. These heights marked the place where the heavens and 

the earth met, and in humanity’s constant toil to reach the mysteries of the heavens, they ascended to the sky in 

pursuit of nearness to their Gods. Javahiran, 16. 

 

                                                           



Halsted 12 

 

civilizations. Almost all early faith traditions reflect a similar concept. The Sumerian god, Enki, 

for example, was frequently depicted as a gardener in the second millennium BCE. Centuries 

later, the Old Testament describes the Garden of Eden. In some way, then, the garden became 

related, through religious practice and holy texts, to the afterlife. By building gardens, 

individuals created terrestrial versions of the paradise their faiths predicted for them after death. 

More relevant to the discussion of Cyrus, the Zoroastrian concept of heaven is that of a garden.

25

 

The Zoroastrian interpretation of the garden as a representation of heaven can be said to play a 

crucial role in the garden’s significance in Iran. By building a garden below the lofty balconies 

of his palace, Cyrus, believing himself to be a representative of the Gods, could look down upon 

a simulation of the paradise he would inhabit eternally following his death.

26

    

Thus far the decision to build the garden and its relative position below a raised viewing 

point has been posited here to be tied to the Zoroastrian tradition, but even more importantly, the 

very layout of the garden itself can also be seen to follow in the same vein. Cyrus’ garden has 

been virtually reconstructed by many scholars to exhibit a quadripartite plan. Reconstruction is 

done with the aid of archaeological surveys and computer imaging of the ruins to recreate the 

layout of the garden as it would have been thousands of years ago (Fig. 4).  

Due to the limited capabilities of archaeological reconstructions of Cyrus’ garden, 

however, there is some debate as to the legitimacy of its suggested quadripartite design. Despite 

the various sources that introduce Cyrus’ garden as quadripartite, upon visiting the site, one finds 

that the garden today is missing its second axis. The remains found there today suggest a 

rectangular garden with a single dividing axis down the center, with no remaining evidence of a 

25

 Porter, 14. 

26

 The later rulers of the Sassian period would take this Zoroastrian concept further to declare themselves gods in 

their own right. 

                                                           



Halsted 13 

 

second axis. It can be speculated, though, that some sort of secondary axis might have existed 

due to the use of a four part square design contemporaneous with the Achaemenid period, and 

even, in some cases, predating it. It is from this very common ancient motif that scholars have 

reconstructed Cyrus’ garden with a second horizontal axis, making it the earliest quadripartite 

design of its kind of which we have any record. If the second axis did exist, the quadripartite 

design can be considered to date back to at least the Achaemenid period, if not earlier. 

Though it is interesting to speculate about Cyrus’ garden, it is not necessary for this 

discussion for his garden to exhibit the quadripartite design. Regardless of this particular 

garden’s design, the four part garden plays a central role in Iranian gardens. It is accepted by 

scholars, including Hobhouse, Wilbur, and Eshrati, as a part of ancient Iranian garden design 

from the time of the Achaemenids to the last great ancient empire, the Sassanians. I believe, in 

fact, that there is no doubt about the existence of the quadripartite gardens of the Sassanians 

upon the invasion of the Arabs in the seventh century. Its existence then is enough to establish 

with certainty that it was indeed a Persian convention. There are four reasons to support the 

belief that the gardens of the Sassanians were definitely quadripartite. 

Though no Sassanian quadripartite gardens will be examined here, it is certain that the 

design was widely used during the period. The first reason to support this claim is related to 

practicality. In Iran’s often harsh, dry climate, use of the quadripartite design would have made 

gardens easier to maintain. Upon visiting Iran, one is struck by the arid nature of the climate. 

How could a civilization turn such a harsh desert into a heavenly paradise? The answer lies in the 

mountains that border the Iranian Plateau. The Achaemenids are credited with the invention of 



Halsted 14 

 

the qanat, which utilizes subterranean tunnel systems to provide water to dry areas.

27

 In order to 

obtain water through the use of a qanat, a vertical shaft is dug into the side of a mountain, 

terminating once the subterranean water table is reached. Then a horizontal tunnel is dug from 

there outwards away from the base of the mountain at a slight downward slope so the water 

flows towards the desired destination (Fig. 5).

28

  The water provided by the qanats was then stored in large mud-brick tanks where it could 

be kept cool and clean before it was used for drinking water or run through gardens in stone or 

tile rills, like the ones at Pasargadae.

29

 For the sake of practicality and the ease of construction, 

these rills were always linear, and water was usually channeled in a square or rectangle around 

the perimeter of the garden. Then, axial rills cut through the body of the garden, forming a four 

part design. These rills were flooded in order to water the garden, whose geometric and 

symmetrical plan allowed for equal amounts of water to reach the plant life. The flowerbeds that 

lined the rills were sunken, meaning that the earth was several inches below ground level so that 

the flowers could easily be watered by the flooding rills. The sunken beds created the illusion 

that one was walking on a carpet of flowers, as the paths and rills were raised so that the flower 

blooms were below ones’ feet.

30

 In the extremely harsh climate, and in light of the labors taken 

to bring water from miles away to the garden, its irrigation had to preserve the greatest amount of 

27

 Open air aqueducts, like those used later by the Romans, would never have worked in the hot Iranian plateau 

where water evaporates quickly. The raising of groundwater was also a major difficulty. The Achaemenids were 

forced to seek other means, and the qanat system was the most obvious solution.  Donald Wilbur, Persian Gardens 

and Garden Pavilions (Washington, DC: Dumbarton Oaks, 1979), 4. 

28

 The digging of these tunnels, which were often hundreds of feet below ground, was very treacherous, and even 

today one can see the many shaft holes that were dug along the way to provide air to the diggers and to remove 

soil and rock. They toiled in the hot, dark tunnels, carefully calculating the angle of their work by the shadow of a 

candle. Sometimes these lines extended for up to forty miles until they emerge on the surface. Wilbur, 4. 

29

 Hobhouse 20. 

30

 The use of sunken flowerbeds explains why the garden is so prevalent in carpet designs in Iran; the gardens 

already closely resembled carpets, making their depiction on carpets both naturalistic and logical. 

                                                           



Halsted 15 

 

water. The quadripartite design, then, was one of the easiest ways to water plants in the arid 

climate.  

Beyond this practical purpose of the four part garden design, there is a second reason to 

suggest that such a design was central to gardens during the Sassanian period. The use of the 

quadripartite design was prevalent during the Achaemenid through Sassanian periods; it 

appeared again and again in ancient artifacts of varying sorts. Many were fashioned long before 

the Sassanian period, which could indicate that the design predated even the Achaemenids. 

Several buttons and other artifacts from the Achaemenid period reflect this quadripartite design 

(Fig. 6).

31

 Pieces of pottery were painted with circular or square depictions of the world 

subdivided, again, in four parts (Fig. 7).

32

 The four part design is preserved, not just on buttons 

and pottery, but also in ancient carpet designs. The Achaemenid period saw a great deal of 

interest in carpet weaving and based on contemporaneous descriptions, scholars have 

reconstructed what ancient carpets (now lost to decay) looked like. Several were quadripartite.

33

  

The Sassanian period too was rich with quadripartite carpet designs, some actually depicting 

gardens with flora and fauna and four water courses subdividing them from a central medallion. 

One example, the “Baharestan” carpet depicts this motif and dates to the mid Sassanian period 

(450-550 CE).

34

 Thus, since the design appeared in so many different media one can assume that 

gardens divided into four parts division also existed during the Sassanian period.  

There must have been a reason for the repeated use of the four part motif. Thus enters the 

third support for the quadripartite design’s existence in Sassanian gardens. It is probable that its 

31

 Ernst Herzfeld, Iran in the Ancient East: Archaeological Studies Presented in the Lowell Lectures at Boston (New 

York: NY, 1988), 23. 

32

Ceramic Bowl, 5

th

 millennium BCE, Iranian Museum of Antiquities, Tehran, Iran. 

33

 Eraj Afshar, Iranian Carpets ( Tehran, Iran: Jamal Honar Publishing, 2013), 86. 

34

 Javad Nassiri, The Persian Carpet (Tehran, Iran: Mirdashti Publication, 2010), 16. 

                                                           

Halsted 16 

 

frequent use might indicate devotional or religious significance. Zoroastrianism is a complex and 

ancient faith tradition with a pantheon of “immortals” and a detailed creation story. But among 

the most clearly understood aspects of the religion is the emphasis on the four basic elements. 

Earth, air, water and fire hold sacred significance to the Zoroastrians. It seems probable that the 

division of space into fourths and partitioning of the world into four sections as seen in the 

quadripartite design could very well represent the four elements as the four building blocks of 

the terrestrial realm. In this way, the four parts come to represent the four elements and could 

explain its widespread use in buttons, pottery, carpets and, as I would contend, in gardens.  

The Zoroastrian significance of the four part design is supported by the strength of the 

religious tradition in ancient Iran, particularly under the Sassanians. They continued the tradition 

of divine kingship and hierarchy which originated in with the Achaemenids. The Sassanians took 

the ideals of the Achaemenid monarchs still further. The Sassanian rulers continued the 

Achaemenid idea of divine kingship, but instead of the representatives of Ahura Mazda, the 

Sassanian kings actually declared themselves to be gods. They imitated gods in their dress and 

called themselves “brothers to the sun and moon”.

35

 In this and many other ways, the Sassanians 

represented not only a continuation and but a strengthening of ancient Iranian tradition. The 

prevalence of the four part design both in gardens and artifacts during this period of religious 

zeal is logical if one accepts the potential Zoroastrian significance of the design. 

Many Iranian scholars explain this ancient desire to divide the world into four sections as 

an attempt to make the vastness of space more manageable.

36

 Dividing a vast space into sections 

allows one to experience it sequentially, introducing a certain degree of organization. 

35

 Duchesne-Guillemin, 121. 

36

 Eshrati, Parastoo. Interview by author. Personal Interview. Tehran, Iran. July 6, 2013. 

                                                           

Halsted 17 

 

Subdivision of space becomes especially relevant in a discussion of landscape design. Specialists 

suggest that rulers subdivided their gardens in order to better view them, and to make it possible 

for one to visually process the vast space.

37

 Additionally, by dividing the garden, rulers could 

symbolically recreate the realms over which they ruled within the garden.

38

 The Sassanian kings 

likely used not only their literal and figurative position of superiority to look down upon their 

four part gardens not simply as rulers, but as gods. The name of the Sassanian king during the 

prophet Muhammad’s life, Khusrau Anushiravan, literally translated means “Khusrau of the 

Immortal Soul” suggesting his diving kingship. Khusrau looked down upon the four sections of 

his garden, representing the four sacred elements he believed were the very building blocks of 

the universe. In this way he simulated his god-like control over the Zoroastrian cosmos. 

Whether the four part garden served practical or religious purposes, there is no question 

of its Iranian origins. The fourth and final reason to support the existence of the design in 

Sassanian Iran lies in its etymology. While this design has been vaguely referred to here as the 

“quadripartite” design its actual name is the chahar bagh design. Chahar bagh is a Farsi term 

which literally translated means “four gardens”. The term is widely used, even today to refer to 

this design. It is not translated, but left in the original Farsi. The lack of any other name for the 

design, and the use of Farsi in its terminology cement the existence of the chahar bagh prior to 

the Arab invasion. Thus, though we may never be sure of the exact date the quadripartite garden 

was first used, we can be absolutely certain that at the very least the chahar bagh is a uniquely 

Iranian convention, and given the strong religious tradition of ancient Iran, reflects Zoroastrian 

significance.  

37

 Hanachi, Pirooz. Interview by author. Personal Interview. Tehran, Iran. June 18, 2013. 

38

 Maureen Carroll, Earthly Paradises (London, UK: The British Museum Press, 2003), 49. 

                                                           

Halsted 18 

 

Section Two 

While the Sassanian kings ruled the Iranian plateau, nomadic tribes from the deserts of 

modern day Saudi Arabia began to invade neighboring lands. These nomads were united by a 

common religion, Islam, and began to set their sights on building an Islamic empire over which 

they might rule.

39

 As a nomadic people accustomed to the harsh deserts of Arabia, the Muslims 

were unfamiliar with many of the conventions they encountered upon their many military 

campaigns and invasions. They had no concept of governmental administration or organization.  

When the Prophet of Islam, Mohammad, died in 632, he had not named a successor. It 

was only through bitter dispute and often, murder, that the succession of Arab Muslim leaders 

was determined. It is important to mention the turmoil of the Arab leadership because while 

many scholars introduce the Arab Invasion as a powerful, unified force under the banner of 

Islam, this is not completely accurate. They were certainly unified by their faith, and motivated 

by their desire to spread it, but the many Arab caliphates were marked by instability and 

corruption. They often relied on the countries they invaded for administration of their conquered 

lands and adopted many of their customs in the hope of stabilizing their own empire. 

In 636 CE, when the Arabs finally reached the Iranian plateau and overthrew the 

Sassanians, they became exposed to the millennia old governmental structures of the Sassanians. 

The Arabs, unaccustomed to ruling a centralized empire and battling disorganization within their 

39

 The prophet Mohammad was born in 572 CE during the reign (in Iran) of the Sassanian king Khusrau Anushirvan. 

While Mohammad’s earliest followers began to spread his message of Islam, or humble submission to God, the 

Sassanians ruled their people as Gods themselves and lived in splendor. Mohammad was Arab and born in Mecca 

(in present day Saudi Arabia), his birth would forever change the course of Iranian history, culture and art. It 

would, however, take several decades for his impact to reach Iran. In the next few years, though, the Sassanians 

became weary from Khusrau’s several military campaigns, and when the Arabs finally launched an offensive attack, 

the Sassanian Empire fell.  

                                                           

Halsted 19 

 

own ranks, placed Persians in the highest governmental offices and allowed the administration of 

the empire to mirror ancient Persian customs.  

Despite this lenience, Islam was still incorporated into all aspects of life, with Islamic law 

or Shari’ah informing civic and political decisions. The Persian Empire was encouraged to 

embrace Islam, but other religions were not persecuted.

40

 This tolerance means, of course, that 

Zoroastrianism, which was still the predominant religion at the time of the Arab Invasion, was 

not outlawed but simply taxed, allowing its practitioners to continue their worship. 

Zoroastrianism continued under Arab rule, slightly weakened, but still very much intact. Slowly, 

Islam was adopted by the Persian people, and Zoroastrianism declined. However the latter never 

completely disappeared, and as Iran’s most ancient religion, it is still practiced by many today.

41

 

The Arabs introduced their religion to the Iranian people without force, and eventually 

Iran became Muslim. It is important to note, though, that as Vreeland states, “Persia became 

Muslim, but not Arabic.”

42

 Tracing the impact of Islam in Iran is fairly straightforward, but 

finding evidence of Arab culture there is not. Despite the strength of the Islamic religious 

tradition as it entered Iran, the secular administration, language, and culture of Iran remained 

intact thanks to the tendency of the nomadic Arabs to assimilate old customs rather than 

generating their own. 

As the Muslim Arabs began to enter the weakened Sassanian capitals they had 

conquered, they were greeted by the lush green gardens the Iranians had so painstakingly 

maintained for a thousand years. While the Arabs likely had encountered gardens before, they 

40

 Daniel, 69. 

41

 While Persians were willing to convert to Islam, they did not lose their very strong cultural identity, and 

eventually, religion and politics separated and when they staged revolts, they did so for political reasons rather 

than as an attempt to reject Islam. Herbert Vreeland, Iran, (New Haven, CT: Human Relations Area Files, 1957), 19. 

42

 Vreeland, 43. 

                                                           

Halsted 20 

 

had no gardening tradition of their own; as desert nomads they would have had little use for such 

practices. Despite this, while experiencing the gardens of Iran they must have felt certain echoes 

of significance and familiarity. The gardens seemed to speak to the invading Arabs. As Muslims, 

the Arabs accepted the holy scriptures of Judaism and Christianity. The book of genesis speaks 

of four rivers in the Garden of Eden. Every Muslim is familiar with this heavenly garden, and in 

fact, it is mentioned over a hundred times in the Islamic holy book, the Qur’an (which Muslims 

believe to be the literal word of God).

 43

 The Qur’an describes paradise, or heaven, as “gardens 

underneath which rivers flow” in Sura II, verse 23, a phrase that is repeated over thirty times in 

the text. If read literally, the Qur’an uses the word “garden” in place of “heaven”.

44

   Every aspect of the terrestrial garden in Iran could be seen to have significance and a 

heavenly counterpart in the Islamic interpretation. The chahar bagh plan of the garden reflects 

the divisions of heaven, the water features reflect the rivers of paradise, and even the flowerbeds 

have allegorical significance. Within this paradise the Qur’an speaks of four rivers in heaven, 

each flowing with a different substance, honey, milk, wine or water.

45

 Muslim scholars, when 

regarding the typical Iranian design of four quadrants, subdivided by four rills with easily 

irrigated sunken flowerbeds, found this garden to be a beautiful manifestation of paradise as 

43

Muslims believe that the angel Gabriel descended to earth and shared God’s divine revelation (in the form of the 

words of the Qur’an) to the prophet Muhammad. As such, the simplest interpretation of Islam derives from belief 

in the words of the Qur’an and modelling one’s life after the life of the prophet Muhammad. Muslims consider him 

to be the “seal of the prophets”, which means that they recognize all the prophets of Judaism and Christianity from 

Abraham to Jesus Christ to be legitimate messengers of God, but that Muhammad is the final prophet. Annemarie 

Schimmel, Islam: An Introduction (New York, NY: State University of New York Press, 1992), 14. 

44

The word “paradise” comes from the Avestan (an ancient Persian dialect) “pairi-daeza” which refers to royal 

hunting enclosures.

 

This word was translated into Greek to mean “garden”. Even in modern Farsi, the word for 

garden “ferdous” can also mean “paradise” Hobhouse, 8. 

45

 Ibid., 68. 

                                                           

Halsted 21 

 

described in the Qur’an (Fig. 8).

46

 Each rill reflected one of the four rivers in heaven. The sunken 

flower beds flanking the rills came to represent “gardens under which rivers flow”.   

There is no record of the first garden the Muslim Arabs built, however we do know that 

by 1370 with the construction of the Alhambra in Granada, the Muslims had begun and 

developed their own gardening tradition. Having established their own stable empires, the Arabs 

had finally created their own Islamic gardens. A cursory examination of the Alhambra reveals 

that the Arabs appropriated the chahar bagh design of the Iranians (Fig. 9).

47

 The previously un-

Islamic Zoroastrian origins of the chahar bagh were forgotten and it was imbued with Islamic 

significance. It was borrowed from pre-Islamic gardens, but became a representation of Qur’anic 

verses and was assimilated into Islamic theology. Though the form of the chahar bagh was 

adopted by the Muslims and widely used in their later gardens (both in and outside of Iran), its 

name was never translated. Islam, unlike some faith traditions, has an official language, Arabic. 

The Qur’an, for example, is considered to be direct revelation only when it is read in the original 

Arabic. Any translation changes the text from sacred to commentary on the sacred.

48

 Thus, any 

and all terms related to Islam are in Arabic. Conspicuously, chahar bagh is not an Arabic term. It 

was never given a widely used Arabic name, and the design is still to this day referred to by its 

Farsi name, even at the Islamic garden of the Alhambra. So, while some ancient conventions 

were neatly overlaid with Islam, the chahar bagh kept, if not its meaning, its name.  

The Alhambra’s use of the chahar bagh is Islamic. Its four rills represented the four 

rivers in heaven, and its sunken beds simulated the Qur’anic “gardens under which rivers flow”. 

The architecture of the structures reflects Islamic use of calligraphy and floral decoration. The 

46

Ruggles, 89.  

47

 Porter, 154. 

48

 Schimmel, 29. 

                                                           

Halsted 22 

 

gardens of the Alhambra are Islamic in both design and origin.

49

 There is one major difference, 

however, between the Alhambra’s gardens and the gardens of ancient Iran. Whereas there were 

many features of the Persian garden that could be “baptized” into Islam and used in Islamic 

gardens, one feature certainly could not. The hierarchical elevation found in Zoroastrian gardens 

could not be given Islamic significance. Islam emphasizes equality.

50

 While the Achaemenids 

reveled in their almost divine kingship (and the Sassanians rulers declared themselves to be 

actual gods), Islam condemns such ideals. It emphasizes, both in the Qur’an and the words of the 

Prophet, living modestly and not maintaining any position of power that might lead to abuse of 

said power. Slavery, though widely practiced in the medieval Islamic world is frowned upon in 

the Qur’an.  

A famous saying of the Prophet’s brother-in-law, Ali, says, “A man approached Ali and 

asked, ‘I want to be the governor of my province, can you help me achieve this goal?’ And Ali 

replied, ‘If you have any desire to be governor, you must never be governor.’” In this way 

ostentation, greed and pride are illustrated as sinful qualities in the Islamic faith. Imam Abu 

Muhammad ibn Muhammad al-Ghazali, a well-known medieval Islamic theologian, warns 

against the dangers of ostentation and pride, saying “The reality of ostentation is seeking a high 

status in the hearts of the people….it is the most dominant of blameworthy character traits…”

51

  In prayer, Muslims stand shoulder to shoulder in mosques, the poor and rich side by side. Prayer 

equalizes Muslims as they all prostrate themselves in worship in the same mosque, no man or 

woman receiving special treatment. These ideas are in direct opposition to the Achaemenid view 

49

 This classification admittedly overlooks the possibility that the garden reflects certain Iranian traditions which 

were assimilated into Islamic architecture after the Invasion of Iran. The implications of this possibility are beyond 

the scope of this discussion. 

50

 Vreeland, 39. 

51

 Al-Ghazali, Ghazali on the Principles of Islamic Spirituality, trans. Aaron Spevack, (Woodstock, VT: Skylight Paths 

Publishing, 2012), 190-1. 

                                                           



Halsted 23 

 

of hierarchy, elevation and kingship, and therefore can be seen reflected in purely Islamic 

gardens like the Alhambra in Grenada. The Alhambra does not exhibit raised viewing platforms 

designed with the purpose of exalting the owner of the garden. The garden is only viewed from 

the ground, equalizing viewers. 

It is intriguing that the gardens in Iran after the Arab Invasion and the introduction of 

Islam do not reflect the basic Islamic tenet of equality, nor do they resemble the Alhambra. 

Rather, they follow the earlier tradition and this surprising phenomenon will, in the next section, 

provide evidence for labeling these gardens as “Perso-Islamic”.  

It is important, nonetheless, not to trivialize the role of Islam in the process of explaining 

and demystifying the gardens of Iran. Islamic ideology is responsible for the majority of the 

gardens commissioned during the medieval period and later in Iran. Iranian gardens have always 

been places of reflection, music, poetry and conversation (as evidenced by pre-Islamic depictions 

and accounts), but with the arrival of the Muslims, they became the backdrop for religious 

discussion, scientific inquiry



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-platon-46.html

the-platon-9.html

the-poetic-genres-in-the.html

the-poincar-conjecture-14.html

the-poincar-conjecture-19.html